The Tim Redmond Story | “I’ve Doubled the Size of My Company Every Year That I’ve Worked with Clay Clark”

Show Notes

Tim Redmond shares how grew a company from 2 employees to 350 employees and the art of creating a scalable sales system and how Clay Clark and Tim Redmond have worked together to double the size of Redmond Growth every year.

Show Notes – https://docs.google.com/document/d/1mZUpFwRAVDR46wOahKcNC5HhSeDpSXA-BJgxJOdOxjM/edit?usp=sharing 

Podcast Audio –  https://www.dropbox.com/s/yaqa41irqt5xvuv/5.16.20%20-%20Podcast%20-%20The%20Tim%20Redmond%20Story.mp3?dl=0 

Book recommendations:

The Ultimate Sales Machine by Chet Holmes – https://www.amazon.com/Ultimate-Sales-Machine-byHolmes/dp/B006DKN4IQ/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=the+ultimate+sales+machine+chet+holmes&qid=1581254664&s=audible&sr=1-3-catcorr 

High Trust Selling by Todd Duncan – https://www.amazon.com/High-Trust-Selling-Money-Stress/dp/B0002QU5D4/ref=sr_1_2?crid=4EVIMCN8F6N8&keywords=high+trust+selling+todd+duncan&qid=1581254612&sprefix=high+trust%2Caps%2C167&sr=8-2 

  1. When I was 19 years old I first got hired to work for the company that you helped to grow from 2 people to over 350 people…I’d love if you could share with our listeners what the company was and how you guys started it?
  2. How did you get your first 10 customers?
  3. When did you start to gain and really feel like you were gaining traction?
  4. What was the most challenging aspect of growing tax and accounting software?
  5. Why did you guys decide to sell the company to Tax and Accounting Software?
  6. After you guys sold the business, what did you do next professionally speaking?
  7. I would love you to share how we first got reconnected?
  8. How long have you and I worked together at this point?
  9. What kind of impact do you feel like that our relationship has had on your growth?
  10. How many clients do you have at this point?
  11. What would you attribute your rapid growth to?
  12. What kinds of systems have you implemented as a business since we started working together again?
  13. What is the vision for Redmond Growth for the next 3 years?
  14. How would you describe our relationship to our listeners?
  15. I had the opportunity to mentor your son Robert…why did you decide to have me work with him?
  16. What is his role with Redmond Growth today?
  17. Why are you passionate about growing Redmond Growth?
Business Coach | Ask Clay & Z Anything

Audio Transcription

Clay:
On today’s show, we celebrate the epic growth of longtime client, Tim Redmond. Devin, you have in your hand right there the actual growth numbers that Tim Redmond has experienced in the past years. Can you read us the numbers please?

Devin:
You got it, 16%, 97%, 25%, 74% and 85% in the last five of years.

Clay:
Now we have Paul Hood on the show here. Paul Hood does a CPA. Paul, you do a lot of things other than just basic math. But if a company has grown by … what was the last number there, Devin?

Devin:
85%.

Clay:
So let’s just say for good even numbers here, and let’s just say the company did $100,000 of revenue last year.

Paul Hood:
Sure.

Clay:
And they’re up by 87% this year, how much larger are they? What would be the gross sales for the listeners out there who are not math people?

Paul Hood:
Well, that would be … what? $187,000 in sales. If they did 100,000 up 87%, that’s 197,000.

Clay:
Okay. So almost double the size.

Paul Hood:
Almost double, yes.

Clay:
And then what were the other numbers there, Devin?

Devin:
We had 16%.

Clay:
Again, if the company did 100,000 Paul and we said 16% larger, so if the company did 100,000 of sales last year, how much would it be this year?

Paul Hood:
116,000.

Clay:
Okay. Let’s play the game again there, Devin. Give us another year.

Devin:
The next number here was 97%.

Clay:
97%, if a company did 100,000 last year. Paul, you’d say it to be 197,000?

Paul Hood:
I would say that, yes.

Clay:
If people go to hoodcpas.com, do you do basic math in addition to the epic accounting and bookkeeping services?

Paul Hood:
Sometimes we do algebra. Actually we do it all, so maybe a little geometry, yeah. But don’t tell anybody because that’s a long time ago. But no, Clay that’s … The exciting thing about that is, somebody does $100,000 up 16%, that’s $116,000. But then if they’re at 116,000 and they’re up 97%, then you’re at … let me see, 1.9, I got the calculator-

Clay:
Come on now, it’s the math podcast. Here we go.

Paul Hood:
Yeah, times 1.97, they’re up another $104,000. So instead of 116, they’re at $220,000 the third year. So, compound, when you do growth like that, it’s compounds. It’s like compound interest or dollar cost averaging, it’s compounded on top of itself.

Clay:
What is really, really fun about Tim Redmond is when we first started working with him, he would have about 20 clients or so, 20 clients on average, he didn’t give in time and now he’s got 100 clients.

Paul Hood:
Boom.

Clay:
Paul, you’re a math guy.

Paul Hood:
I am.

Clay:
If you go from 20 clients to 100 clients, how much bigger are you?

Paul Hood:
That’s a 500% growth.

Clay:
Sick.

Paul Hood:
Yeah. That’s a bunch, that is staying busy. What is crazy is, I bet he was working hard when he had 20 clients. So, clay, with all the things you teach is not only how to get business, but how to be productive and having that business and having the time to building, have a 500% growth. That I think is one of the biggest things people overlook.

Clay:
Paul, the numbers are so good at Redmond Growth, they’re so sick. I’m getting nauseous.

Paul Hood:
Get that man a pail.

Clay:
I’m going to have to move my microphone to the bathroom, I’m not going to finish, I’m just feeling sick.

Tim Redmond:
I have doubled every year-

Clay:
Mic check, mic check.

Tim Redmond:
… since working with you-

Clay:
Do you guys hear me? Okay, I heard you.

Tim Redmond:
… I’ve doubled clients have doubled in revenue every year.

Clay:
Devin, we have to stop the track. Paul, we have to stop the track. I’m getting nauseous because it’s so sick, it’s so good. It’s like the vomit is right there in my mouth and I’m just holding, I’m holding it back and I fight it. Here we go.

Dr. Breck:
Which is just incredible. I mean, the first time you did it, that’s one thing. But when you do it repeatedly, I mean, that’s unbelievable.

Tim Redmond:
We’re working our blessed assurance off this year, we’re planning on doubling again. We’re incorporating new-

Clay:
Get me a bucket.

Tim Redmond:
… some new things in there that really helping us do it, but we are going to double in this year.

Dr. Breck:
I mean, I just want to say, I appreciate both of you guys. I really look at the coaching that you provide for me-

Clay:
Hold back my hair.

Dr. Breck:
… I’m so indebted to you. I like being in team to a navigator and the Thrive team is the engine in the car. But you put me in the driver’s seat, and I used to not be

Tim Redmond:
I have doubled ever year, [inaudible 00:04:27] revenue every year.

Paul Hood:
Devin, Devin, look, there’s some [inaudible 00:04:38].

Devin:
Oh, thanks.

Clay:
It’s coming up again.

Speaker 6:
Some shows don’t need a celebrity in the writer to introduce the show, but this show does, two man, eight kids co-created by two different women, 13 multimillion dollar businesses. Ladies and gentlemen welcome to the ThriveTime Show. (music)

Clay:
Yes, yes, yes, and yes. Thrive nation, you are in for a laser show today because on today’s show, we are inviting Mr. Tim Redmond onto the show. Tim Redmond, how are you sir?

Tim Redmond:
Doing really well. Clay, it’s so good to be back on the show here, it’s been a while.

Clay:
You’ve not been in the man cave since the flood.

Tim Redmond:
Since the flood, Noah-

Clay:
I didn’t know that it was that old. I mean, you’ve been in-

Steve:
Tim, you look young.

Tim Redmond:
Thank you.

Clay:
… you’ve been in the man cave before, but before the flood, I believe, right?

Tim Redmond:
I’ve been in before the flood.

Clay:
Now, for the listeners out there that don’t know, when I was 19 years old, I got hired to work for a company called Tax and Accounting Software Corporation. This was a company that you grew, you and another guy, you guys grew it from two people to 350 employees. So, from you to, can you share, where was the company started, was it in a garage, was it in an apartment, was it an office space, where were you physically located when you started the company?

Tim Redmond:
We were in an apartment complex. The international headquarters were in a three bedroom condo at 31st in Mingo, which is a bustling part of Tulsa.

Clay:
It’s a really nice area.

Tim Redmond:
Yeah, for some.

Clay:
People who are out there who don’t understand, that’s not a nice part of Tulsa.

Dr. Breck:
Well, you might have to speak multiple languages down there.

Tim Redmond:
Yeah.

Clay:
You have access to a liquor store and bail bonds and pawn shops and all the essentials there, but it’s not a super area-

Dr. Breck:
[crosstalk 00:06:47] on the windows kind of place.

Tim Redmond:
There’s a lot of entrepreneurs there at a-

Dr. Breck:
Street side.

Clay:
Okay. How did you go about getting your first 10 customers while growing Tax and Accounting Software Corporation? I think the first 10 clients are the hardest to get for a lot of people listening out there.

Tim Redmond:
Yeah. We actually contacted the number of CPAs in the Tulsa area and got them to try the software out, is initially a writeup of bookkeeping system, so we got them going with that. Then we got right into sending out mailers and we would send out a few thousand mailers at a time, 5,000 grew up to 10,000, 20,000, we eventually grew up to 400,000 mailers three times a year.

Clay:
At Tax and Accounting Software, what kind of software did you provide for accountants? Just so the listeners have some sort of context.

Tim Redmond:
Yeah, yeah. As a bookkeeping, they call it Write-Up software, is like a bookkeeping service. Also, we did taxes for all types of tax forms for various states. We ended up having about 200 programs were maintained, we [inaudible 00:08:03]

Clay:
Now, did you write the software or did the other guy write the software, who wrote the software?

Tim Redmond:
The founder of this was Tim Claire. I couldn’t program myself out of a wet paper sack, but I knew how to grow systems, I knew how to grow where we can get the right people and the right places and doing the right things, and so that’s what I was good at.

Clay:
How old were you at the time when you started working with-

Tim Redmond:
I was 25.

Clay:
25?

Tim Redmond:
25 years of age.

Clay:
When the company was sold, how old were you?

Tim Redmond:
I was 40 years old.

Clay:
What year was that, do you remember?

Tim Redmond:
Actually it’s 2001, it was April 2001. I think I had just turned 41-

Clay:
At that point, when you guys sold the business, I was interning there and that’s how I first heard of you. I was interning under Todd Starkey and Steve Heck are the guys who brought me on there. When did you feel like you were really gaining traction? When did you look up and say, “You know what? We should move out of this apartment,” when did that happen?

Tim Redmond:
We hired a programmer to help the founder, Tim Claire. He was, at the time, a rather large person and it just made our little place very crowded. S, we decided that after we hired the first programmer, we had a whole system. What’s key to get a business going is having a sale system that really works, it’s repeatable and you can scale it, you can turn it up. So we started doing that and we can predictably get X number of demos or X number of leads coming in. At that point, we invested the money to get some other office place-

Clay:
How is the system different than networking? I see a lot of small business owners that are stuck in the world where they don’t have a system. They think they have a system, but their system consists of their personal effort exchanging their personal time. It would be a guy like Dr. Breck, I’m sure you’ve seen a lot of chiropractors in your industry who go to networking events and that’s their sales system, it’s passing up their card, networking. Breck, have you met chiropractors like this?

Dr. Breck:
This has been my system up until working with you guys for coaching. Tim Redmond is my coach and two years ago, we got together and that’s where my system started to come.

Tim Redmond:
Dr. Breck my chiropractor. I let him touch …

Clay:
What? Whoa, that is a-

Steve:
Family show.

Clay:
Family. But seriously, you now have a sales system at dr.breck.com. You did for the first time, for the first time. Back to you Tim, the system, people think they have a system, but they don’t.

Tim Redmond:
No, I have the same thing. I started coaching and I had a whole bunch of people come to me and I was generating between 25 and $40,000 a month in coaching just because of my charm and because I knew a few people. But it would go up and down, Clay, that’s when I came to you as I was going up and down and I wanted to go up and up instead of up and down, so that’s when I needed a system. Creating a system is you have nailed down specific steps that you’re going to take no matter how you feel, no matter the results, you lean into them and you do them regardless of what’s happening. You lean into them and it will give you X number of leads, you follow up with those leads turns into sales, that’s the system.

Clay:
I want somebody out there to get this idea. It is only scalable if it’s repeatable by somebody who is not that smart, not that smart. So I want to make sure we’re getting this idea, not that smart. So somebody out there needs to write that down and think about this because when I worked at Tax and Accounting Software, I would have been 19 or 20 at that time. My job was to answer the phone, when accountants, CPAs would call us for customer support and they would ask questions about their, I want to say their 1040-EZ Form or some 1099 or W2 or some protocol. With no knowledge of accounting at all, I was trained within about two days how to do it, how to answer the phone, how to answer their questions. Somebody out there for whatever reason … I don’t understand, I’m trying to help you. I’m trying to empathize, it’s so hard for me, I don’t get it.

Clay:
I don’t understand why somebody out there is not making a system that’s scalable. I don’t understand why you’re not using a script, I don’t understand why you personally insist on answering the phone, I don’t get it. I’ve never had that thought, I don’t get it. Tim, what makes you an effective coach is you do empathize. What makes me an effective coach is that I don’t empathize, but I have enough results that people, no, seriously, I have enough results that people are like, “I hate you, but I’m going to do it.” You are a little more kind, but to help the listener out there, somebody out there who is just they don’t have a script, it start with a script, they don’t have a script that a 19 year old intern can use, and they insist on doing it themselves. Help somebody out there.

Tim Redmond:
Well, I’ll tell you if you don’t have a script and you don’t have a system, then every day is a whole new creation. You’re creating a lot of energy just to figure out, what are you going to do? The best example is, Peter Drucker of father of modern management. He said, the most effective executives make one decision a year. What you do is you make a decision, what is your system? And then you work like the Dickens to make sure you follow that system. That’s really what it’s all about. With a script here … we have a brand new girl that just came in working for us. She nailed down the script and she’s been nailing down appointments. Usually, we try to get one appointment for every 100 calls, we make two to 300 calls a day per rep, and she’s been nailing down five and eight appointments a day-

Clay:
Somebody out there is having a hard time-

Tim Redmond:
From the script.

Clay:
She’s making how many calls a day?

Tim Redmond:
She’s making between two and 300 calls a day.

Clay:
How long did it take you to train this person?

Tim Redmond:
We had a half a day.

Clay:
I just want somebody out there to write this down. This is some profound crap and I don’t get it. I don’t get it, I want to help you, but somebody out there needs to be slapped around a little bit. Listen, listen, it’s not that freaking hard to write a script for a dentist. It is not hard to write a script for a cosmetic surgeon. It is not hard to write a script for your church, it’s not hard. What the hard part is, it’s you and your freaking stinking thinking, you’re addicted to stuff that doesn’t work. It’s like you’re in this habitual loop of jackassery and you’ve been in the outhouse and the Porta Party of life so long that you smell bad and you can’t figure it out. Dr. Breck, Tim’s been able to help you.

Dr. Breck:
Absolutely.

Clay:
I think at one point, you might’ve been in the outhouse life where you were stuck out there.

Dr. Breck:
Yeah, it’s done.

Clay:
Working hard in the doom loop. You’ve been a chiropractor for a dozen years.

Dr. Breck:
A little more.

Clay:
A little more than that, you were stuck. How much have you grown since having one-on-one coaching?

Dr. Breck:
We’ve more than doubled.

Clay:
More than doubled?

Dr. Breck:
Yeah.

Clay:
What advice would you have for the listeners out there who are struggling with the cons that are pushing back to going, I want to implement the script, but it’s just hard?

Dr. Breck:
Well, there’s a couple of things. I mean, one, I would say, if you think that you can do everything yourself, hey, your vision’s just not big enough because you’ve got to elicit the help of others. You’ve got to build a team around you and you can’t really properly do that without the systems. So you need the systems to do more than what you can do as an individual, one person running the whole show. As I’ve said it before, I was one man band and it sounded terrible. So, if you want to be an orchestra, you’ve got to bring on the other instruments, you’ve got to have the whole team working together. And then the scripts is one part of it, it’s like the sheet music for that orchestra. You’ve got to have something that you’re following that everybody’s playing together, everybody knows where to start, where to stop, how loud, how soft, what beat we’re on, and then it works.

Dr. Breck:
I mean, there’s a proven path, you get on it, you follow it. I’ve heard you come up with stuff just off the cuff here recording that I was blown away by, just how it could be implemented and how it could be done. And those were just simple, easy things that you’ve done it so many times, you know this is what needs to be said, this is how that needs to happen, and then you just do it.

Clay:
Let me give you an example out there. Steve, I want to get your take on this. But like writing a book, I’ve had so many people tell me, “Clay, I want to write a book.” I said, “I’m going to help you write a book.” They said, “How do you write a book?” And I tell them the proven system, I’ve done shows about the system. This weekend, my wife has had a cheerleading event, she’s gone at the cheer thing. So, my kids are being watched by grandma. I picked up my kids at noon, hung out with them for about two hours. And then grandma was hanging out with them and I hung out with the kids from six o’clock until 10:00. But the rest of the day, I had my own day.

Clay:
So what I did on Friday is I got home from work at 4:30 PM, and I went to sleep because the kids were at grandma’s house. Set the alarm, went to sleep. Then I woke up at 11:45 and I got up and I wrote a book, and then I did it again yesterday. So I have written two books that I’ve wanted to write in the last two days and it only requires about 24 hours of work. Somebody out there says, “Well, I want to write a book.” You have to know the system, but then you got to do it. I’m not absent father, I got to find the weekend where they’re at a cheer event or something and I do it. I don’t understand why somebody would want to learn the system and then not implement it. That’s why I want to get Steve’s take on this because Steve has been a joy to coach because we’ve never had to have a talk about motivation. Steve, we’ve never had that talk.

Steve:
Yeah.

Clay:
Can you please explain to the listeners out there what kind of person would not be a good fit for coaching with me. Then I want to tap into Tim’s take on this because Tim is a business evangelist and I don’t get it. But Tim will actually call people, we’ve had this discussion a lot and I don’t get it, but Tim will actually call people who don’t call him because he cares about their business enough to call them. These are people who don’t even know they need coaching. He’ll call him and ask them where they’re stuck, and he has the empathy needed to coach the uncoachable. He’ll do this for years and help somebody grow a business. For me, I only coach people that reach out to me, and even then, out of every 100 people that reach out, we only take on one usually. Steve, talk about, what is that thing with you, what’s your inner drive, why do you just implement all the stuff we teach you?

Steve:
I don’t know if I heard it from you or where it was from, but I think it comes down to discipline versus motivation. I think a lot of people are looking for motivation or to get motivated to write that book or to get motivated to call their leads or to get motivated or get in the right mood or to get where they feel right. It has nothing to do with that, it has everything to do with being disciplined to be able to do it.

Clay:
The inspiration is the reward.

Steve:
Yeah.

Clay:
You get it after you do the thing.

Steve:
Yeah, and people are just weak asses, that’s what it comes down to. One of the first books that I read that was in sales was Ultimate Sales Machine, but there’s another one-

Tim Redmond:
Chet Holmes, yeah.

Steve:
… called High Trust Selling. It talks about, what you would call the law of the iceberg. You can Google this and it’ll show you. Everyone wants what’s above the surface, everyone wants the success and all the accolades and they want to look cool and drive the Lamborghini and do all that, but they don’t want to talk about what happens below the surface when people aren’t watching, they don’t want to talk about the five o’clock in the morning radio show podcast that you’re doing. They want to talk about the fact that you have a lot of people listening to your show, but they don’t know all the stuff that goes on in the background. I think that’s where people trick themselves into thinking that you can just have all the success without having the discipline to do the crap no one wants to do.

Clay:
Tim, you are a benevolent guy. I don’t understand it I don’t understand … We’ve talked about this a lot. I don’t understand what makes you want to call people and then coach them into becoming disciplined, but I’ve seen you do it. So, what is it that drives you to want to reach out to people who are not reaching out to you and to actually help them? Because I’ve met these people at conferences and their lives have been changed. What is going on inside the Tim Redmond cranium there?

Tim Redmond:
Well, I see where people have come from or where they’re at because I’ve been there.

Clay:
Got it.

Tim Redmond:
It doesn’t take that much to go from a flat or a downward spiral to going up, it really requires that person to own their life, to own their business. If they’re business owner, if they can own it … We just remind them of the specific steps it takes to own what you’re supposed to own. When they start to own it, good stuff starts happening. So, I’m convinced that, now you have more of a limit, Clay, of how many people you want to coach and I’m ramping up, even beyond you.

Clay:
Our relationship is weird in that, if someone were to buy an Apple computer today or let’s say about a personal computer, a PC, the computer is made by, let’s say Dell, but then the software in the computer would be Microsoft, let’s say or Adobe or whatever that is, I basically make the systems and you’re like the computer and I’m like the software, is how I would describe our relationship. Tim, I want to ask you this, when you and I reconnected, I think it was in the year 2000 and … what was it? Maybe 2010, is that right? 2011 maybe or … Let me go further down the road, maybe 2013.

Tim Redmond:
2012, you-

Clay:
2012.

Tim Redmond:
… you were just starting to put together your whole Thrive campaign.

Clay:
Okay. So, 2012, and at that time, I was five years removed from the DJ business. You were how many years removed from Tax and Accounting Software?

Tim Redmond:
It was about 10, 11 years.

Clay:
Okay. I started coaching clients. My wife was telling me the story, and I totally forgot about this, but 2002 or three, I wanted the Renaissance Hotel to refer me. I had one of America’s largest wedding DJ company at the time called djconnection.com. I wanted the Renaissance Hotel to refer me and I wanted Tarp Chapel to refer me, and I wanted Facchianos, the bridal store to refer me and they wouldn’t refer me. So I said, “What do I need to do to get you to refer me your weddings?” And they said, “Well, we’re not going to do something like that.” I said, “Well, if I can help you double your sales, would you refer me?” In all cases they said, “Yes.” So my first coaching clients were these venues where I would go in and double the sales of a wedding venue, and then they would refer me.

Clay:
It’s easy for me to double a company, it’s very easy. It’s very linear, it’s step by step, we just do it. We have enough guests on the show who can share their stories hopefully. At some point, you’ll understand, as listener, that this is true. Coaching clients in 2017 or eight, Vanessa said, “Why don’t we file an LLC?” So we filed makeyourlifeepic.com, it was called Make Your Life Epic because an epic movie involves a hero who starts off with a goal. It has to go through some adversity in route to their ultimate success, and that’s what growing a business like. So, we met … How did we really meet, what was the first interaction? There was some interaction where you and I first connected. I just remember that somehow you and I went to Hideaway Pizza. Do you remember when we first reconnected?

Tim Redmond:
Yeah. We had that speaking thing that-

Clay:
There it was, so it’s Victory Christian Center. I was speaking there, and through a series of events, the event started late and I did not know that you were speaking after me. So I spoke for the allocated amount of time I was given, and that was eating into your time as the keynote speaker. I did not know I was eating your time and you did not know that I was asked to start late, and so it was that initial-

Tim Redmond:
During that time, Clay, that was my profession, I was, really for about 10, 11 years-

Clay:
You were speaking.

Tim Redmond:
… of traveling around the world really doing ministry. I would do coaching as a way to make up for … instead of getting love offerings, I got a lot of hate offerings from churches, so that’s how we met. You didn’t realize that I was the keynote and I thought you were just another one of these people I didn’t know-

Clay:
Who’s eating into your time.

Tim Redmond:
… and eating and my time. And I was the main guy and I was pretty full of myself at the time.

Clay:
You had a table out with your book, the Power to Create. I remember I was talking and I was probably about, at this point, 5 minutes over into your time, but I didn’t know. I’m getting this evil eye from the guy … By the way, if you’re out there listening, the worst thing you can ever do is go over time, I’m just telling you. If you’re a speaker out there, the most discourteous thing you can ever do, the worst thing you can do is to ever go over time. So I’m starting to pick up on this, I got some pretty decent emotional intelligence.

Steve:
Tim’s got a pretty mean stinker

Clay:
I’m also on slide four of 10, so I’m trying to hustle through it. Afterwards, we shook hands. I realized there was something weird, we exchanged numbers. The next time we met was-

Tim Redmond:
Understand clay that based on what happened on that table-

Clay:
What happened was?

Tim Redmond:
… was the means for me to feed my family for that week.

Clay:
No, I get it, I get it. Terry Fisher and his wife, Julie, nice people. They’re in their 50s, I believe, in 60s now, 60s maybe, 60s?

Tim Redmond:
Yeah, he’s about 65.

Clay:
They invited me over for a Christmas holiday event at their house. I was the only guy there who wasn’t 45, I think. I was there and Julie offered me Wassel. Steve, have you had Wassel before?

Steve:
No.

Clay:
It’s a hot cider.

Dr. Breck:
It’s yummy, you have no idea.

Clay:
I didn’t know how hot it was nor did I know what it was. So Julie says, “Would you like a Wassel?” I said, “Sure, I’d like some Wassel.” I asked my wife, “What’s Wassel?” She says, “Well, it’s an apple juice, basically.” I’m like, “Okay.” I always operate 95 miles an hour in the 60 mile an hour world, I chug things. If you give me a bottle of water, I’ll usually finish the thing in on just gulp, it’s what I do. If we go out to eat, Vanessa always says, “This is not a race,” so I have to slow down. I chugged the Wassel and it is so hot that I drop this really expensive, I think Kinsey China, I mean, it’s probably $100.

Tim Redmond:
Everything that Julie has is first class, but she is just a wonderful person that just wants everything to be perfect.

Clay:
Interaction number one, I speak over into Tim’s time. Interaction number two, I spill a Wassel at an event where I’m clearly the young buck who shouldn’t be there.

Steve:
And you burn your throat.

Clay:
Right. Things were not off to a good start.

Speaker 8:
Surely you can’t be serious.

Speaker 8:
I am serious, and don’t call me surely.

Clay:
You said, Hey, what’s your story? Let’s go out for lunch, so we met at Hideaway Pizza and that’s where I’m more in my element, where I’m one-on-one and I can talk about facts. I don’t do well with social service.

Tim Redmond:
You were actually telling me, Clay, about your vision with this Thrive 15 and, “Hey, I was thinking about having you be on board as part of my board of advisors and meet and launch this thing out.” So that’s really what connected us here was you telling us about your vision.

Clay:
So we met for pizza and at some point, you were like, “What’s going on with your coaching, how do you coach?” I said, “Well, I’ve got clients. Most of them stick around for years, I meet them, I find out their goals. I don’t really try to tell them their goals, I find out their goals and then I build a business vehicle that helps them get there.” You were telling me about your consulting, and I said, “Well, what I do is consulting with the backend.”

Clay:
So where you are doing speaking and coaching with executives that already had a big team, you were coaching huge companies, companies that already had a big team. I’m like, “I’m coaching people that don’t have a team. I coach people that, they don’t have a graphic designer, photographer, web developer, all that stuff.” So I’m doing consulting with the backend, you’re doing speaking with the leadership coaching. I said, “Maybe you and I could team up.” I think you have been a client of mine for, is this eight years now, or nine?

Tim Redmond:
Yeah. We had an exchange because I believe in the law of exchange rather than law of free.

Clay:
Can you explain to listeners out there what our relationship has been through those last eight years? The good, the bad, the up, the down, just they know because I like coaching guys like you or guys like Dr. Breck as previously stated. I like coaching diligent people that haven’t figured out. What role did we play in helping you and how did that work?

Tim Redmond:
You helped me go from this networking and people that knew me to help me create a sales process that would cue up clients much more frequently than I was queuing up through my networking speaking, that type of thing.

Clay:
We office in the same building, and what’s really fun is that you came to me and you said, “I need a right hand guy to help me grow Redmond Growth, could you teach my son the force?” Essentially was with him, “Could you teach him the moves, the systems?” You gave me free range for, I think about six months to mentor your son from zero to hero. Was that about six months?

Tim Redmond:
Yeah, it was phenomenal. I had come to you initially, Clay, and I said, “Hey, listen, I want … You said, “What’s your goal?” That’s just what you say, “What’s your goal?” I said, “I want to be a Centurion, I want to coach 100 businesses.” You say you stayed with me, and in our joint quest to want to create a scalable coaching program, you were doing it, I wanted to do it. Robert came to me, and I said, which by the way, family, I said, “Robert, you’ll always be my son. I’ll always love you.” But in the first paragraph I said, “But you are fireable if it doesn’t.”

Clay:
I want to make sure you get this about family, I don’t mind hiring family. I just want to make sure we’re clear, I don’t mind hiring family. I just want to hire diligent people, I don’t care if you’re family or not. This is why the vast majority of my family, it hasn’t spoken to me in years and I’m totally cool with that. I just cannot be around negligent people, so I wouldn’t hire you if you’re negligent, whether you’re family or not. I mean, Robert is a diligent guy, so we worked with Robert on-

Tim Redmond:
He really did well.

Clay:
He had already done very well in the world of recruitment, he was doing very well as an HR recruiter, a hiring guy, a head hunter guy. But we worked with Robert on teaching him search engine optimization sales, he actually worked on the search engine team for a while.

Tim Redmond:
It was a rough environment, hugely demanding. So he was like, “Dad, I don’t know if I could do all that you want me to do.” He’s making $100,000 a year as a 25 year old. I said, “Okay Robert, I promise you that I’ll pay you less than half initially, that’s my promise to you.”

Clay:
So Robert had to master though, he had to master search engine optimization. He went from a six figure job to starting at the bottom at Redmond Growth, learning the-

Tim Redmond:
Having to learn all new skills that you were teaching him and it was a tough environment. Up early five o’clock, work until 5:00 or 6:00-

Clay:
Every day.

Tim Redmond:
… getting stuff done, getting stuff done on the weekends. I mean, it was transformative for Robert, for you to create a new reality of saying, if you going to own a business, this is what it takes to own a business.

Clay:
Robert, Jonathan, Kelly and Julia Marriott are the only people I’ve ever met who’ve been able to learn the systems that fast. So, the search engine system, the sales, the branding, the marketing, the accounting, the legal, the workflow, the emotional connection, all of these, how to manage people, the checklists, all the things we had to teach them. It’s like getting your MBA in six months, is what Robert did.

Tim Redmond:
Yeah, it was awesome. I’m the visionary, and then Robert has very deservedly moved into an integrator. He makes sure things get done and implemented, and he’s phenomenal at that. I will say, Clay, I’m very grateful to you leaning into him. I mean, you leaned into him without mercy, it was awesome.

Clay:
He’s been great. I will tell you, Jason, you’ve seen this with clients. When we first start out writing a script, the script is never right.

Jason:
No.

Clay:
But you have to use it, right?

Jason:
Yeah, and it’s going somewhere.

Clay:
So we started making a script for Redmond Growth. Again, this is where the interesting thing is here.

Tim Redmond:
I wanted to complicate it so much, Clay, and you kept it simple.

Clay:
We had to keep simplifying, simplify … I think we are on about version maybe 25 or 23 somewhere around there not version 30, we were on version 20 or something. We’re recording the calls, and every meeting is the same meeting. Every week we play the recorded calls because it’s a three part system. Step one, call 300 people every day, by the way, 300 calls per person per day. Step two, you book about five appointments. Step three, of those five appointments, there’s about one or two that are a good fit. The next step is actually onboarding them, it’s a process, but we would listen to the calls and tweak the script, and this went on. I think it took us about, when we really focused on just the script, maybe five months, four months of just that iteration.

Tim Redmond:
Pretty intense things. My brain will tend to complicate things with Redmond Growth, you slowed us down and said, “If that there’s no mastery in this little step, there’s no growth in your business. Stop complicating, stop moving ahead, stop getting shiny object all over. We’re going to nail down this script and we’re going to get it trained.”

Clay:
Paul, what advice would you have for Tim, for somebody out there who’s not listening to their calls? The time is passing, but they’re not listening to their calls every week.

Tim Redmond:
I have a question, why are you hating yourself and the growth of your business so much, why do you not want to grow? That’s what I would ask them, just very simple. Just do it, don’t complicate it, don’t say here’s why we can’t do it, just do it and watch your bank account become extremely obese.

Clay:
If you go back eight years ago, think about the number of clients you had back then versus the number of clients you have now. As a percentage, what has been the growth over the past eight years do you think? We’ve got to inspire somebody out there who we just don’t have the time to listen to there call.

Tim Redmond:
Okay. Clay, it’s like, I would go up and down from about $10,000 a month up to about 40,000, but it’s up and down roller coaster. So now, we’ve got to where we’re in excess of 100 clients.

Clay:
That’s awesome.

Tim Redmond:
So, I would have anywhere from five clients to 20 clients on my own with networking, but I had no control over it. Without the systems, you’re going to be victimized by your own business.

Clay:
But there is somebody out there who struggles with math, if you would say that your average number of clients was 30 and you go to 100, as a percentage, what is that?

Tim Redmond:
I have grown, I have doubled every year since working with you. So I’ve doubled in clients, have doubled in revenue every year. It’s a 100% growth every year, I’ve worked with … We’ve been good friends seven, eight years, and I’ve got doubled five times.

Dr. Breck:
Which is just incredible. I Mean, the first time you did that’s one thing, but when you do it repeatedly, I mean, that’s unbelievable.

Tim Redmond:
We’re working our blessed assurance off this year to do … we’re planning on doubling again. We’re incorporating some new things in there to really help us do it, but we’re going to double again this year.

Clay:
Again, double every year. Jason, there’s somebody out there who’s not wanting to record their calls. Have you ever had a client that didn’t want to record their calls?

Jason:
Oh, absolutely.

Clay:
Do you want to ask Tim a question? Maybe he could inspire somebody out there who, for some reason they just don’t have the time, they can’t get the calls recorded, they can’t put the software on, they can’t download the call, they’re just … Because again, really what this is, we say what the story is about, the story is about a diligent man by the name of Tim Redmond who had a big goal to help people. The marketing Avenue that works for your business is cold calling. I mean, without the cold calling, it’s not going to work. Now you’re getting word of mouth and people are telling each other, but there somebody out there who they just don’t want to pick up the phone. What questions would you have for Tim about that? Because he’s mastered the art of the cold call.

Jason:
Being a business owner who has gone through the gauntlet of writing the script, actually making the calls, the one thing the main objection I always get is, shouldn’t I just hire somebody to do that for me? I don’t have time for that or that’s not my highest and best use. So you say, okay, let’s get these tools in place. They’re good with the call scripting, but when it comes to the recording, they don’t see the value in listening to the calls, trying to basically watch the game footage to fix it. So, what’s something that you have done or something you would say in order to help motivate that person? Because I always operate teaching them the pain because I’ve been through the ringer before.

Jason:
I used to work in one of Clay’s call centers, and so we’ve had times where my calls were really good. And then 80% of the time he says, “Hey, slow the hell down. You talk too fast or follow the fricking script, so you can have the same conversion every time.” So, trying to teach them through the pain sometimes doesn’t work. So what’s another alternative that you would just say, “Hey,” in a polite way, “Dummy, this is why you have to record your calls and follow up on the training when it comes to that.”

Tim Redmond:
Yeah. Owner’s own stuff. So, I did not want to own all the calling. I would make calls here and there and I wasn’t diligent. Clay has been very kind to me, but I wasn’t. I was depending on how well known I was around town or around the country, but I really wasn’t that diligent with it.

Clay:
But once you started to make those outbound cold calls and get your team to make those outbound sales calls, talk to the listeners out there about the importance of recording those calls and actually listening to them.

Tim Redmond:
You’ve got to accelerate your learning, you’ve got to own it, you’ve got to get around it, you got to do it yourself until you can get it mastered.

Clay:
I have pastors I’ve worked with in the past and I can say this, if you’re a pastor out there and you’re not diligent, please don’t reach out to me, please don’t do it. It’s a form of cognitive dissonance I cannot handle. I cannot handle you making an income and working less than everybody I’ve ever met, I cannot handle it. It’s just a form of cognitive dissonance. I work with great pastors now, but I can tell you if you are a pastor out there and you want to reach out to me and you are running … If you’re living the easy life on somebody else’s dime, do not call me because I will go off at you. But a pastor to be good has to be good as a speaker, as a teacher, as a trainer, as a leader.

Clay:
A guy back in the day, who is no longer a Christian, by the way, but he once was Carlton Pearson. Carlton Pearson, he was my speech coach. He was the top evangelist of his time at that time in America. He was the number one mega church pastor in Tulsa at that time, and he was on the Christian broadcasting network. He told me something that changed my life, awesome. As I hired him to teach me speaking, he said, “Clay, after every sermon, I would watch it.” I said, “What, you watch the whole thing?” “I’d watch the whole thing and take notes about what I did well and what I could do better.”

Clay:
It had to do with every aspect of it and he said he did every single time, and you must do it as well if you want to become a truly great speaker, as he once was. He looked at me and he said that, “You must listen to every single speech you’ve ever done. I mean, listen to it.” So, we record the conference audio and there’s a lot of reasons for it, but I listen to the entire 15 hours every time.

Tim Redmond:
Wow.

Clay:
Come down here and hit play, I’m working on stuff and I listen to it because I find the moments where it went … It’s not because we’re the highest rated business workshop in the world right now, it’s not because I’m great, it’s because I’m very self aware. Now at the time, when you’re in it, Tim, it’s hard to be self aware. When you’re speaking, it’s hard to be self aware, but when you hear yourself seven days after in your man cave and your wife and kids are at cheerleading and you’re down there and you go, that part wasn’t good. You can fix it, there’s-

Tim Redmond:
When that energy dropped and you-

Clay:
Yes. Again, pastors who will watch their own sermons get better quicker. What would you say to somebody out there that’s just struggling to be self aware? Maybe it’s not cold calling, Tim, maybe it’s that their advertisements don’t work, but they’re loyal to it. Their checklists or lack thereof don’t work, but they’re loyal to it. What would you say to a business owner that’s been stuck in a doom loop where they’re growing by 10% a year, 1% a year?

Tim Redmond:
I want to have an honest conversation with myself. No, Clay, being a speaker and listening to your own messages, that was very hard for me because I had to own what I would consider would be failures in different parts of the speech. So, a lot of people don’t want to lean into what you leaned into to make herself a phenomenal communicator, which you are because of the fear of pain. I would say to anybody, look at what is going on in your business. Is your business serving you, are you serving it? And then what is working and what is not working? Just have an honest conversation with yourself on the results, you like the results, you don’t like.

Clay:
I used to stutter a lot. I mean, I couldn’t talk very well at all until about the age of 13. If you’ve ever stuttered, it comes back at a time that you don’t choose. For me, it usually comes back in the very early morning and at the end of the day, when my brain gets lazy, it’ll come back. So starting our business conferences at 7:00, I’ve got to get up usually I get 2:00 or 3:00 to work through the mental cobwebs on the day of a conference because you don’t want to be the stuttering speaker guy. The weird thing is when you stutter, people look at you weird, but not maybe as weird as you think they look at you at first. And then you get weird and it gets weirder and it’s this doom loop of failing. Breck as a chiropractor, Tim with Redmond Growth had to help you become self aware-

Dr. Breck:
Absolutely.

Clay:
… of the things you do well. Maybe I’m incorrect about this or maybe I am correct, you tell me. I don’t think Tim’s had to help you gain a care for your clients or your patients.

Dr. Breck:
No.

Clay:
I don’t think he had to teach you anything about chiropractic care.

Dr. Breck:
No.

Clay:
But what kind of things has he had to teach you?

Dr. Breck:
Oh man, there’s been so many different things. One of the first things we did was about profitability and where our price structure was, so that was one of the first task we took on the website. I had done a buyout with a partner, and so I had been an indentured servant in a lot of ways. There were a lot of just bad systems, bad habits that were in play that we had to just work through. We created one sheets, he’s done a ton of things as far as content for the website, asking for those Google reviews. Like I said, we were getting some Google reviews organically and it was about 15 over the course of about 15 years. So that doesn’t really work out so well. Now we have 327 where we just … we haven’t even been as diligent as we need to be on that. I mean, the difference is enormous, even in what little bit we’ve actually been able to implement.

Dr. Breck:
I feel like I’ve got Tim on a, he’s a bulldog ready to go and I’ve got him on a leash because of all these different things that we have yet to really put into play.

Clay:
It’s exciting.

Dr. Breck:
I look at it like the foundational work that goes into a skyscraper. We’ve been doing a lot of dirt work, we’ve been doing a lot of foundation stuff, getting the systems in place, getting things set and ready to go. Now we’re seeing the fruit in that with the new relocation, with the building, with the team.

Clay:
That’s exciting.

Dr. Breck:
We’re about to ramp up into exponential growth.

Clay:
Just for anybody out there who missed it or maybe misheard it or maybe I didn’t do a good job of underscoring it. How much have you grown since working with Tim Redmond and the Redmond Growth team?

Dr. Breck:
Well, in different ways, different amounts-

Clay:
As a percentage of profitability.

Dr. Breck:
I mean, at a point, I literally was making $1,200 a month.

Clay:
That’s a hot deal, that’s a hot deal.

Dr. Breck:
I mean, that was my take [inaudible 00:44:36].

Clay:
Do you want to be a chiropractor or a-

Dr. Breck:
Anything.

Clay:
… lemonade stand manager? You make the same amount because you were at 1,200 a month.

Dr. Breck:
$1,200.

Clay:
Have you grown the profits since working with Tim at Redmond Growth?

Dr. Breck:
I mean, we’ve had months where we were able to bring in over $100,000. I mean, there’s a significant difference of chiropractor.

Clay:
That’s actually a larger, if you think about $100,000 versus 1,200, that number is larger.

Dr. Breck:
Yeah. A little bit, just a little bit. So, now I can pay my bills. As far as the number of patients that we’ve seen and the sustained growth, the numbers that we’re tracking, I mean, we’ve more than doubled the practice from when I took over from the other chiropractor.

Clay:
Now Tim-

Tim Redmond:
Breck has been very smart with aggressively saving money. So he’s taking his profits and setting it aside. So as he’s expanding, he’s not freaked out with what it’s requiring of him because he aggressively saved his profits from before.

Clay:
Tim, you have the floor. I’ll let you hit the nail on the head and wrap up the show. You have about a half million listeners that listen to the show and I’m sure a lot of them want to know, what’s your vision for Redmond Growth? I mean, you’ve helped so many clients so far, you’re continuing to grow. What do you see as the vision for Redmond Growth? I think a lot of our listeners are curious to know how you have grown a company from two people to 350 employees in the past. What does the vision look like for Redmond Growth?

Tim Redmond:
We’re going to get our business to coaching 300 clients, I call it [inaudible 00:46:09] 300, I won’t cover the illustration we use for the 200, that’s just you and me, Clay.

Clay:
Got it.

Tim Redmond:
We are going to expand out into buying businesses as well. We’re going to be expanding out into setting up a leadership restoration center, which has been a vision of mine since college days and we’re going to do that from a place of strength rather than a place of weakness.

Clay:
That is awesome stuff, that’s awesome stuff, Tim. It’s been a pleasure serving you these last eight years, five years working together. It’s been fun watching you guys grow, it’s been an honor coaching your son. I think that you entrusted me with your son was-

Tim Redmond:
Oh, man. I’m hugely, hugely thankful for that.

Clay:
That was probably the scariest thing in my life because it’s somebody’s son and I’m feeling in many ways like Darth Vader. Jim Gaffigan and Darth Vader are one person. So when I’m working with someone, I’m like, do you want me to teach Luke Skywalker the forest because he could turn out to be Darth Vader. It’s like when you give someone the force, I feel like you’d go … I mean, when you give someone that much power and that many tools and those systems that have taken me 23 years to learn and you put it into a six month course, it’s been an honor to serve you guys. Robert is just awesome.

Tim Redmond:
I’m telling you, I watched your character and the consistency of your character and that’s why I wanted my son to sit under your tutelage here, that’s the driving force. You worked [inaudible 00:47:46] off, you do a lot of things right. But I see the character and the consistency of your heart, and I go, I want my boy to get that from Clay.

Clay:
Well, man, I appreciate you so much and the folks at Redmond Growth. Dr. Breck, are you chiropractically prepared to break a boom?

Dr. Breck:
I am. I just want to say I appreciate both of you guys. I really look at the coaching that you provide to me, I’m so indebted to you. I like Tim to my navigator and the Thrive team has the engine in the car, but you’ve put me in the driver’s seat and I used to not be.

Clay:
I appreciate you guy so much.

Dr. Breck:
Thank you.

Clay:
Jason, are you a ready to bring the boom, are you metaphysically ready to go?

Jason:
Oh, yeah, absolutely. While Breck’s driving the car now, I’m just hanging out in the back.

Clay:
It’s a party.

Jason:
Yeah, it’s awesome.

Clay:
Tim, are you prepared to bring the boom?

Tim Redmond:
Let’s do it.

Clay:
Remember, we’re going to take one giant step back from the mix because otherwise the mics are going to be too hot, too hot. Here we go. Three, two, one, boom.

Tim Redmond:
Boom.

Jason:
Boom.

Speaker 8:
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