Tim Redmond | The Tim Redmond Client Success Story

“I would have anywhere from 5 to 20 clients w/ networking, but it would go up and down. Clay, that’s why I came to you. I’ve doubled every year since working with you. That’s 100% growth every year. I’ve doubled 5 times.”
– Tim Redmond


 

“Since Working With Clay I’ve Learned Everything About Business. The Experience Working Here Has Been LIFE CHANGING. I’ve Gained a New Mindset.”
– Robert Redmond


 

Are you looking to take your business to the next level? Are you wanting to become the next Clay Clark client success story? Learn more about how Clay Clark helped Tim Redmond to grow Redmond Growth today by watching the inspiring Tim Redmond story below:

 

 

Video Transcript

Speaker 1:

Get ready to enter the Thrive Time Show.

Speaker 2:

(Music)

Clay Clark:

Tim Redmond. How are you sir?

Tim Redmond:

Really good, Clay. It’s good to be here again.

Clay Clark:

Hey, so we are talking today about the seven principles to powerfully manage your money. Now my understanding is as a business coach, as an executive coach, you have helped clients all over the world… When I say all over the world, literally you’ve traveled all over the world helping people, whether it be churches, or businesses, or anybody get their finances together. Is that right?

Tim Redmond:

Yeah. Cash is king, Clay. And so, if we don’t learn to manage the cash inflow and outflow, we’re not going to build anything of lasting value. And it is the basic life skill that we’ve got to nail down as Thrivers to really begin to succeed.

Clay Clark:

Now, my son, he’s just now getting into that age seven zone, and what he’s doing is as soon as I pay him any compensation for work… I don’t give him allowance. I pay him for a compensation for services rendered.

Tim Redmond:

Yeah, very good, very good.

Clay Clark:

But he wants to spend it immediately. And as adults, it seems like we want to keep doing that too. So I’m excited to hear how we-

Tim Redmond:

We still have a seven-year-old mind in our spending today, even as grownups.

Clay Clark:

… Well, Tim, when Thrivers start implementing these best practices, and we get emails all the time from people that you’ve coached and I’ve coached all over the country and they say, “Oh my gosh, I’m making more money than ever.” Their marketing’s taken off, they’re making more money. But, in order to build wealth, we have to learn how to control our money, whether we’re upside down in our finances, swimming in an abundance of money, or basically completely debt-free. So Tim, in your mind, why don’t more people know how to control their money?

Tim Redmond:

Well, there’s just the steps of learning how to do it, and that’s why in today’s episodes we’re talking about seven principles and the really seven steps towards really getting a grip on your money. So there is that. There’s just an ignorance of how to do it. And then, there’s this huge emotional thing that swirls around money and our negative associations with money, “Money is the reason my parents got divorced or my business partner betrayed me.” And we’ve got all these negative things rolling around money, and our need for instant gratification. So all these things are swirling around and it makes a mess with our money.

Clay Clark:

Tim, here are some crazy stats, and if your brain explodes at any point, let me know, I’ll go get some duct tape and we’ll all hold it together. So here we go. 27% of all households who make over $100,000 a year say they can’t afford to buy everything they need.

Tim Redmond:

Unbelievable.

Clay Clark:

Now, I know that some people watching this live in New York where for $100,000 you can get a corndog, and then some people live in Tulsa, where for $100,000 that goes a long way. But the principle here is that the majority of our U.S. population is saying they can’t afford what they need.

Tim Redmond:

They can’t afford what they need. That is just bizarre, especially those people over $100,000 because that puts them in the top 2% of all wage earners in the whole world. And, why is that going on? You start with how do they define what a need is? And so, a lot of our cash management issues are because the way we look at wealth and poverty is more of a relative thing.

Clay Clark:

Yep, yep.

Tim Redmond:

On the stat, I think the operative word there is they don’t have enough for what they need. And I think that’s something that we blow up in our mind, Clay. That’s the challenge.

Clay Clark:

Tim, in 2013, there was a study that was conducted about the dependence that people have on government and it says, “America is increasingly moving away from a nation of self-reliant individuals, where civil society flourishes toward a nation of individuals less inclined to practicing self-reliance and personal responsibility.” What does that mean and why is that beginning to happen?

Tim Redmond:

Well, this quote is really in this study is really talking about how people don’t want to take personal responsibility for their lives. They want the government, the big brother to take care of them. They want their company and their retirement to take care of them. They want their relatives to take care of them. People don’t want to take personal responsibility, and that’s just the opposite of our Thrivers. You’re not going to thrive if you throw away responsibility on somebody else.

Clay Clark:

So Tim, why is money such a source of pain and anxiety for so many people?

Tim Redmond:

Well, again, it goes back to this negative association they have with it. They don’t want to take responsibility. It requires them to take full responsibility of knowing where the income’s coming in and where it’s going out. They’re given into being very compulsive, this instant gratification, giving into their feelings. They want this, want that. They don’t want to take this personal responsibility. And I think about this amazing article I read in Motley Fool, and it was this lady talking about Grace Groener versus Richard Fuscon.

And it was this lady that was born in 1910, and in the depression she got a job as a secretary. She never really moved above the role as a secretary in a company. And she just died in 2010. She lived to be a 100-years-old. And then, this Richard fellow was a big time executive making hundreds of thousands, millions of dollars every year, working for Merrill Lynch. And, he got out of the corporate realm in the year 2000. 10 years later, he’s got all the money he knows what to do with. Here’s this lady with secretary wages forever. 10 years later, he declares bankruptcy in 2010. In 2010, this lady finally dies, has an inheritance of $7 million that she saved as a secretary. So it’s this whole idea where we just get absorbed in the moment of whatever we want to do, we just give into our compulsion. We got all this pain and confusion having to do with money.

Clay Clark:

Well, Tim, America’s spending habits are really out of control at this point. In fact, there’s research that was done in 2009 by the Census Bureau and it was showing that basically for every dollar that I earn as an American, I’m going to spend a $1.33.

Tim Redmond:

That’s outrageous.

Clay Clark:

And that’s a good government spending thing. That’s less than what the government spends. Right?

Tim Redmond:

Yeah, yeah. Well, yeah.

Clay Clark:

That’s a budget cut almost. Okay. So, now 52% of Americans are spending more than they earn is basically what Huffington Post is showing.

Tim Redmond:

Okay, so greater than 50% of people are spending more than they earn.

Clay Clark:

Yeah. And then, our main man, Thomas Jefferson, this is what he famously said, he said, “Never spend your money before you’ve earned it.”

Tim Redmond:

Okay.

Clay Clark:

Which, to me, seems like pretty deep stuff here. So the idea is that we shouldn’t spend money before we’ve earned it, and people are spending more money than they actually have ever touched. So, Tim, what causes people to spend more than they have? What is the deal?

Tim Redmond:

Well, everything’s about lifestyle. Everything’s about in the moment. Everything is about enjoyment. Because credit is so easy. It’s so easy to borrow, it’s so easy to spend more than what we have because we can get access to this money, so we’re going to give into our pleasures right now. And so, we allow our lifestyle, our spending to follow our lifestyle, instead of our spending to follow our actual income coming in.

Clay Clark:

One more time. One more time. You’re saying we allow our lifestyle to control what we’re-

Tim Redmond:

Yeah, yeah. Number one, we have lifestyle determines everything. It doesn’t matter what our income is. And the proper way, they way our Thrivers are going to begin to really succeed, not only are they making money now, because they’re following these best practices here, but they’re going to be able to build wealth so they can become more powerful, more influential, and the way they’re going to do that is instead of allowing their lifestyle to lead their way, they’re going to allow the income that they have to determine what their lifestyle is.

Clay Clark:

… And, for anybody watching this right now, one thing as we dive into these principles I want to share is, I have had an opportunity to consult with people that make half a million dollars a year, people that make a million dollars a year, and they have to work right now today in order to keep up what they already spent. So they’re borrowing against their future all the time. And literally, you have guys who are making massive amounts of income who have to work every hour of the day just to pay off what they already spent. And it’s sad. And what we’re wanting for you to do as a Thriver is to be able to not just thrive financially in terms of making a lot, but thrive as a person, thrive as a dad, thrive as a mom, be able to enjoy downtime, enjoy able to be able to go to your kids’ games, and be able to hang out with family and friends. And so, this is huge.

And so, we’re going to get into this first principle here, but as we’re getting into this first principle, be thinking about we’re trying to help you thrive as a person, not just earn as much as possible here. Who is the boss of your finances? Why is this your first principle?

Tim Redmond:

Well, what we have, Clay, is we have one of two roles. One of two relationships that we have with our money. Either we manage our money or our money is managing us. And a lot of times, see our decisions should be determined by the goals that we set that we’re working towards. And a lot of times we’ll say, “Well, we can’t go on vacation. We can’t do this because we don’t have the money.” We allow our money or lack of money to determine our decisions. They’re the boss of us, instead of us being the boss. And so, when we learn to live below our means and we get a plan for where we’re going to go, and these are principles we’re going to cover here today, we begin to move to being the boss instead of being bossed around by money. So many of us, we go up and down emotionally because we got this bad boss called money that’s bossing us around.

Clay Clark:

Winston Churchill, this is the guy who basically stood up to Hitler. And, without Winston Churchill and his boldness, we’d all be speaking German. I’m from German ancestry, so I can make that joke. But we’d all be speaking German.

Tim Redmond:

It’s not a bad language, but we didn’t want to be forced to have to speak it.

Clay Clark:

True. True. We would’ve all enjoyed driving the German automobiles though, if that would’ve been forced upon us.

Tim Redmond:

Yeah, I’m with you on that one. I’m a BMW lover.

Clay Clark:

So, “The price of greatness is responsibility.” He says. He says, “The price of greatness is responsibility.” Tim, what is he talking about?

Tim Redmond:

Well, when you begin to be the boss of your finances and you become the boss of your cash flow, what I have found when I am coaching people… And I love to do coaching with businesses that need to turn around, they’re in cash flow, just a horrible shape here. But I really like coaching companies that are doing well and they just want to do gooder and gooder. I mean, I like doing that. And so, what I find that these abundant-minded people do is they love the word deliberate. They love taking responsibility. They love having the choice, making the choice. And so, when you are talking about managing your cash flow and really being the boss of your cash flow, you’ve got to be deliberate with your plans, with how you’re making the money come in, you’re tracking it, and then where the money goes and really, really getting a grip on that, being deliberate with the plan that you have.

Clay Clark:

In your book, Power to Create, which we happen to have a copy of here. In your book, Power to Create, you say that, “Money has the uncanny ability to take on the nature of whoever controls it.”

Tim Redmond:

Yes. This is a very, very important point here. Money taken on the nature of whoever holds it. We subconsciously give a lot of power to money. Because wow, with money we can get anything. There’s even a verse in the Bible that says that money answers everything. Okay? So, there’s some truth to that. But really, when we take a look at the reality here, money is just this piece of paper or this gold coin, it doesn’t have any intrinsic value in and of itself, it’s whoever holds it that is who has the power to put this money as an employee, to put it to work for us. Money begins to take on our purposes. It begins to fulfill whatever we want it to fulfill.

Clay Clark:

So, let me ask you this though. If I am struggling with this concept, what is maybe an action step that I can do to become the boss of my money?

Tim Redmond:

All right. In the remaining principles, we begin to show you how to become a boss. A very practical step is to go right into principle number two, which is knowing where you’re at and really keeping track of the money coming in and money going out. Most people don’t do that. Clay, I have had businesses I’ve coached that don’t keep track of their accounting. They have no idea where they’re at.

Clay Clark:

So, principle number two says, “Know where you are.” And, the idea is to know where your money is, know what’s coming in, what’s coming out right now.

Tim Redmond:

Right, right.

Clay Clark:

Tim, a Socrates once said, “An unexamined life is not worth living.” What is he talking about? And how does that relate to this concept of knowing where you are?

Tim Redmond:

All right. So, unexamined life is not worth living. You could probably say, and I’m sure Socrates probably said his next statement was, “Your unexamined finances is probably not worth sustaining you.” We want people to thrive. Thriving is the whole concept of growing and increasing, not just with stuff you own, but your influence, and your peace of mind, and the relationships you have. And so, if we don’t know where we’re at, and this is an unexamined part of our life here, it’s really a place of irresponsibility that how can we get to where we want to go if we don’t know where we’re at? It’s like, if we have a map and we want to get to a place, and the map is wrong, and we don’t know where we even are to start with, we’re going to get lost along the way here. And so, this is really the power we have is if we’re going to take responsibility, we’ve got to know where we’re at.

Clay Clark:

So are you saying that every entrepreneur needs to set up some financial tracking system? Is that what you’re saying?

Tim Redmond:

Yeah. It’s something that I recommend with everybody in your business, even in your personal life to set up some tracking system, like a Quicken, like an electronic system. Some people use a spreadsheet. Some people use old ledgers that they write it down manually. What I recommend nowadays is they have programs like Quicken, or Money, or there’s all kinds of different-

Clay Clark:

Is there one in particular that you would recommend?

Tim Redmond:

… I personally use Quicken.

Clay Clark:

Okay.

Tim Redmond:

Okay? That’s the company that ended up buying the company that I grew up and we sold it to them. And so, I’m preferential towards them. We want to get a system, Clay, that’s very important, that automatically pulls in our transactions from the bank and the credit card, and that’s where most of our transactions are. So to know where’s our money coming from and where’s it going to if we can have it automatically pulled in for us, instead of having to keep track of all these things manually. And most people aren’t detail minded. Most of my clients are brilliant business people, but they’re not detailed minded towards that. And so, we want to create some tracking system of this.

Clay Clark:

Tim, I know that you’re a big proponent of automating the transactions when possible. Why is that? Why wouldn’t you just want to manually take care of bills?

Tim Redmond:

Okay. So, automating is two aspects. One is the thing we just talked about here, where we have transactions from our credit cards or debit cards and the banks from the transactions. Those are automatically coming into our tracking system. And then, what I have, as much as I can, I want to reduce the number of decisions that I make. The most effective people that I know become effective because they stay creative on the most important problems to solve, and they try to automate or reduce the number of decisions they make. Really, setting up a system is setting up a series of decisions that you want to have made every time. That’s what a system is.

And so, if we set up a system to automatically get all of our bills, utility bills, our mortgage payment, even the income coming in, direct deposit, which is an automatic deposit process for your pay, even if you have your own company, you can set up direct deposit where things are automatically done. Even money that you have come in, you can have your bank set up a percentage that goes into a savings account for every dollar that comes in. So you want to do this just so that you pay your bills on time. You don’t have to think about it. You’re not worried about it. There’s no anxiety there, because you know it’s being taken care of.

Clay Clark:

Mm-hmm. So, I mean, Quickens the software that you use. Is there a deal with your bank? I mean, is there a certain process or a certain… Like, if I’m watching this and I am totally unfamiliar with this idea of automatic deposits, or automatic withdrawals, or how to do that, is it all within the Quickens suite? I mean, I can do all this or what?

Tim Redmond:

They may have all this stuff that you can do within Quickens, and I think they’ve come out with those features. Most banks now will have a bill pay process.

Clay Clark:

Okay, cool.

Tim Redmond:

And most vendors, like your utility company, you can actually set up an arrangement where you provide them your bank account where they can get… Or your credit card, and they get direct access to that. So you set this up, they test it to make sure it’s really you, and then once it’s set up, it’s automatically taken care of.

Clay Clark:

So, that’s an action step. Anybody watching this can do. I mean, this is something that you can do.

Tim Redmond:

Either using your bank or going directly to the vendor that you owe and say, “Listen, I want to set this up where it’s automatically paid.” And they love that, because they get paid on time, you pay on time, everybody’s happy, and you’re not wigging out about what’s being paid or what’s not being paid.

Clay Clark:

Now, Tim, there’s three different types of expenses that all of us have. First, there’s the mandatory obligations. Second, there’s the discretionary expenses, and the third, there’s the desired expenses. So, describe to me what the first one is. Describe for me what the mandatory obligations are.

Tim Redmond:

Mandatory obligations, those are commitments that you have to make every month or every week, whatever the arrangement is. Mandatory obligations are like a mortgage payment, utility bills, if you want to keep your house cold in the summer and warm in the winter, student loans, whatever loan program.

Clay Clark:

Sweet student loans. I love them.

Tim Redmond:

I love student loans.

Clay Clark:

Student loans are good.

Tim Redmond:

And, if you borrow money, you ought to pay it back, that’s my own personal viewpoint here. And so, all these that you have to make payment of, and there’s no mercy from these people, if you don’t pay them, they’re going to sue you. If they don’t pay them, they’re going to turn off whatever you’re buying from them. So, car payments, whatever types of loan payments that may be.

Clay Clark:

Now, the second you talk about is discretionary expense. What does that mean?

Tim Redmond:

Okay, discretionary expenses are needed expenses. You can’t just not do those expenses. They’re required, but how much you spend of those really is determined by you. It’s determined by the income you have and you living below that means. Okay? So living below your means is not this negative scarcity minded process, it’s really a discipline effort for you to get powerful control over your finances.

Clay Clark:

What’s an example of a discretionary expense?

Tim Redmond:

So, discretionary expenses could be your clothes. Like, if you show up for work, we’d like for you to wear clothes, that would be a good thing. Or if you go in public in most situations, most societies, they want you to wear clothes. So you ought to buy clothes at some time. But you don’t know how much. Let’s say your mortgage payment is $800 a month.

Clay Clark:

Mm-hmm.

Tim Redmond:

Your clothes expense is not 800 or 400 or $200. You’re not required to spend that much money. It’s discretionary. You need to buy clothes, or you need to buy food, or you need to buy, go out to the restaurant with your wife at least once a week or once every three years on these dates. But, it’s up to you. It’s a discretion. It’s a decision that you make to determine how much of it you want to spend.

Clay Clark:

Now, the third is called desired expenses. What do you mean by desired expenses?

Tim Redmond:

Desired expenses are expenses you don’t have to spend at all. Okay? Now, this has slipped into some of our needs. You got somebody making $100,000 living in Tulsa, Oklahoma, or Broken Arrow, or Coweta, which has got this huge cost of living increase here. I think it was 0.3% increase, hit their front page of their paper. And so, we have this $100,000 a year coming in and we need to have this, and this, and this. And so, this desired expenses, that’s stuff that we don’t have to spend, but it’s saving up for a vacation, saving up for your kid’s wedding or education.

Clay Clark:

If someone’s watching this, there’s a couple of things that I want to bring up here that when you describe this, I’m thinking of things where we confuse it as a need. I talked to a business owner the other day who has a totally safe vehicle, about 2004, 2005. It’s a truck. And this vehicle works great for daily business stuff, right? And he comments, “Well, I’m getting a brand new one, because I want it to be more safe for the family.” And then, I look and I notice there’s a super sweet, just brand new, one of those Samsung tablets, brand new one, nothing wrong with Samsung, but a brand new tablet, just awesome.

Tim Redmond:

The latest.

Clay Clark:

Latest, yeah.

Tim Redmond:

Latest one.

Clay Clark:

And a brand new phone. And the whole thing was he’d commented, “That’s a nice phone you have. I just got that.” All this stuff. And this guy’s barely making it financially. And I just thought, in his mind he’s confused what is a want. Because he has a car that works, but instead, he’s choosing to get a brand new one because he needs to be safe. Or he needs a phone to better communicate with his client and he keeps adding all these things.

Tim Redmond:

Yeah, that’s self-justification. You are going to justify, “Well, that’s going to be a mandatory obligation because I’m going to justify it as that.”

Clay Clark:

And it’s a deal where I think all of us are guilty of it.

Tim Redmond:

Yeah.

Clay Clark:

I know at some point in early in my career I was doing that. I know that a lot of people do that. So, I just want to make sure as you’re going through these, because these are powerful here. You have the mandatory obligations, the discretionary expenses, and the desired expenses. I think it’s really important that you might bust out a sheet of paper or type it on the screen here and sort your expenses. Go ahead and go through the process of doing this, because if not, you might confuse categories.

Tim Redmond:

Right, and I would recommend if you’re married and you want to stay married to actually do this with your spouse, where you decide together what is mandatory expenses, what are discretionary expenses, and with your income you’re at right now, how much is this discretionary income do you want to spend? Like, “We have to go out here. We’ve got to take a break.”

Clay Clark:

You got to go out.

Tim Redmond:

“I mean, we can’t be cooking every night in the kitchen. We have to go out.” Okay, well how much is that? That’s discretionary. Then the desire is, by all means have desires, have plans and goals or places you want to go to, and people you want to meet, and things you want to experience, begin to save for that, and begin to work to where you want to spend money you have, not money you’re going to eventually make. And that’s where we get into a trouble here with this spending thing.

Clay Clark:

Now, principle number three is we want to know where you want to go. So let’s talk about this. Tim, Napoleon Hill, the bestselling author once said that the starting point of achievement is desire. Keep this constantly in mind, weak desire brings weak results, just as a small fire makes a small amount of heat. Tim, what are some powerful questions that we can all ask ourselves to identify where we really want to go with our life?

Tim Redmond:

Okay, this is good. And just take the whole thought here, Clay, of the power of questions, questions unlock our mind questions. Our brain begins to answer the questions we ask it. And so, if we ask weak questions, we’re going to get weak responses. If we ask it strong questions, it will solve for those strong responses. And so, what I have found as I’ve worked with these precious people, my clients and people that I talk to in seminars and humanity, myself when I look in the mirror.

Clay Clark:

Humans.

Tim Redmond:

Humans. People that are humanly human. And what we’re talking about here is most people, when you ask them where they’re going or what they really want in life, they don’t have a clear answer.

Clay Clark:

And I think for a lot of people, when we ask the question to you, we say, “What do you want to do? Or what do you want to do with your life? Or what goals do you have?” I think a lot of people will just say something like, “Well, I want to be successful. I want to be financially well off.” And that’s the answer we respond with.

Tim Redmond:

Right. “We want to be successful.” Well, if you make one more dollar than you did last year, I guess, you’re successful and that you’re growing. That’s the problem here, Clay, is when Napoleon Hill wrote that very powerful, powerful statement, he talks about definiteness of purpose and that definiteness of purpose is tied to, I can say, a definiteness of desire, a very specific desire, those smart desires, they’re specific, they’re measurable, they’re attainable. They got some risk attached to it. And they’re time activated. And so, most people don’t know where they want to go. They know about where they want to go, but there’s no jet engine of the fire of desire that’s got to be very specific.

And so, I like to ask these questions here, “What do you want out of life? What are your key goals that you’re working towards? Are they specific goals? Are there places you want to go? What in your life do you want to stand for? There are certain things that you want to have set over you when you die and your eulogy. What are people going to say about you when they’re looking at your corpse and saying, ‘There’s a good man, and here’s why…’ What do you want them to say over you? What are some things you want to buy? What are some things that you never gave yourself permission to buy that you really want to give yourself permission to buy? Write them down. Be specific about it.” That’s what we’re talking about here. Where do we want to go? Be specific about it.

It comes to mind here. When you think about thriving, which is what this organization is just passionate about, just being contagious and activate the thrivingness within people. You think, what is the opposite of thriving? You think, well, surviving. But, here’s what I want you to think about. The opposite of thriving is drifting. One is very specific, and they’re purposeful, and they’re going for it. The other one’s just drifting along, “Well, I don’t know. I don’t want to have a goal. What if I don’t reach it?” Well, you probably won’t.

Clay Clark:

Drifting is so dangerous.

Tim Redmond:

It is very dangerous. It’s this horrible sense of existence where you shut down your creative energies on the inside.

Clay Clark:

I think drifting is dangerous because you have the illusion that you’re getting somewhere. And so, I think a lot of entrepreneurs watching this, maybe you’ve always wanted to start a business or maybe you have one now and what you’re doing is on a daily basis you are not actually saving money, but you’re saying that you’re wanting to get ahead and you’re saying the right thing. You actually are professing that with your mouth, but you’re not doing it and you’re just drifting. And I think what you’re talking about is a lot of specific ways that we can begin to build some financial momentum here.

Tim Redmond:

Yeah, where do you want to go? That’s this principle we’re talking about. Where do you want to go? Why do you want to go there? I mean, you think about, what savings do you want to set up? How fast do you want to pay down your debt? I know when I was running the software company, we’d have these big bonuses that I would get. And, my wife and I agreed to have X percentage of those bonuses that paid down our mortgage. So we just paid down our mortgage down, down, down, down. So we had a specific purpose that whatever came in, this percentage of it, we just applied it against that. So, we want to really make sure that our Thrivers, in order to thrive in the cash management, you got to have a plan to where you want to go. And, don’t think you have to have this grandiose plan. Even if you’ve never done this before, start small. But get something very specific you want to work towards.

Clay Clark:

Okay, Tim. Now, principle number four is called close the circle. What are you talking about when you say close the circle?

Tim Redmond:

Well, it’s a term that I got from a friend of mine, Earl Pitt. He wrote a book called Wealth Riches and Money. And he used the term closing the circle is answering a very important question in cash management, which is answering the question, how much is enough? So, if we have the circle that’s open, that means when we have more income coming in, we’re just going to spend it, or we have a tendency to spend it. When we close the circle, that means we say, “Listen, if I get more income than I have over the budget, I’ve got a purpose for that to go into a certain savings account or wealth investment account. There’s a purpose for that. There’s a destiny for that dollars that I’m going to put aside. That way, I’m not going to be all over the board and allow my lifestyle to go ahead of my income like it does so frequently.”

Clay Clark:

And I think a powerful example of this would be Warren Buffett, where he currently actually lives in the same house that he bought in 1958 for a $31,500.

PART 1 OF 5 ENDS [00:32:04]

Clay Clark:

In 1958 for $31,500.

Tim Redmond:

You think he’s got it paid off?

Clay Clark:

Apparently, he drives the same Cadillac that he’s had for quite a while. He doesn’t have a computer at his desk, doesn’t really use a cell phone. I think some of those things might be things that maybe wouldn’t be practical for you if you’re watching this, you don’t have a cell phone or maybe not to, but the principle here is that he bought a house a long time ago that serves his needs. He feels very comfortable with the house, so now, he’s on to doing other things, which is with his money, he’s blessing a lot of people right now with a lot of his charitable things, but I think he decided at one point that he was going to cap his income. I think I’ve read where he capped his income about $175,000 a year, which is still a very high amount for a lot of people, but he’s capped it there. It’s very unusual for people, because I think he has a value or a net worth of billions of dollars, but yet he’s capped his income at $175,000. It seems like he’s really closed that circle, like what you’re talking about.

Tim Redmond:

Yeah. This is really, really important for our thrivers here.

Clay Clark:

If you’re in a sales position and your income is going up and down month after month, how does this principle apply?

Tim Redmond:

Yeah, this is in your sales, you’ve got a business, you’re starting the business or let’s say you’re starting to use some of these marketing and sales strategies that we’re explaining in these videos. You begin to apply these best practices and in the process, you may have a month and you make $25,000. Another month, you lose $4,000. You’re all over the board. What we want to do is not have you live a boring life. We don’t want our thrivers to live a boring life, but what we want to do is, we want to create stability for growth. Closing the circle is saying, “Listen, I’m going to live by this much money.” Let’s say it’s $5,000 a month. Let’s say it’s $5,000. Let’s say one month, I make $8,000. Okay? What you do is, you take the $5,000 you’ve already got allocated, great. You put that to work just the way you’ve got that set up.

The $3,000, you put it aside into a savings fund, and let’s say the next month, you maybe only make $3,000, but you want to live on $5,000, so you’ve already got stash on that, so you can take $2,000 out of that to put in there. You think, yeah, but I’m just not that disciplined. You can be disciplined. It’s very simple. By taking the mandatory expenses, you’ve got your discretionary expenses, then you’ve got your desired expenses, and then you’re living within that particular amount and you’re not stuck there forever, Clay. Some people go, “I just don’t like living in that bondage.” What’s the other bondage they live in? They live in the bondage of living from hand to mouth, living from month to month.

Clay Clark:

There’s three things that I heard you say there, and I want to hammer that is one, it requires making a decision. You have to start to say that you are disciplined. You have to start to say, you can’t just say, “I’m not that disciplined.” We need to start to say right now, “I am disciplined.”

Tim Redmond:

Thrivers are disciplined.

Clay Clark:

I am disciplined. I can do it. Discipline, discipline, discipline.

Tim Redmond:

Discipline.

Clay Clark:

Discipline, discipline.

Tim Redmond:

Discipline.

Clay Clark:

Discipline, discipline.

Tim Redmond:

Discipline.

Clay Clark:

Discipline. The second is, we have to look at savings as actually a form of freedom. The example would be, you have time freedom when you save. As an example, whenever my wife and I move, and we have five kids and growing businesses, so we’re always moving. Every three or four years we move, and when we move, because I’ve saved money, I can pay a builder to move, and I pride myself on not packing a single item. I just am like, “Move that, move that, move that.” I can’t stand it. I was able to save time by saving money and I can basically get time back by paying people to do things I don’t want to do, necessarily.

Tim Redmond:

Yeah. You’re paying for a hassle-free life. You’re paying to not have to think about stupid stuff you don’t want to think about.

Clay Clark:

That’s because on a daily basis, I decide to not buy things I don’t need. I don’t put things in my house I don’t need or buy new TVs every week. I just get what I need.

Tim Redmond:

You’re disciplined to plan the work and then work the plan. You’re disciplined to follow a plan, closing the circle of saying, “Listen, I’m going to live within these means right here, and when I’m all over the board, I’m going to stabilize that.” This is very, very important to build a platform for growth. That’s very important for you watching this right now. What we’re saying here is we want to create that stability. When we go over, we put the money aside. At any time, we can say, “Listen, I want to move from living on $5,000 a month to now, we’ve been topping over $10,000 a month every month, month after month. I’ve got all this money in this savings account. I’ve followed what you’re saying, Tim.” Now, we’re going to move from $5,000 to $8,000. You rearrange those mandatory expenses and those discretionary expenses and you set up a plan and you follow the plan.

Clay Clark:

I’ll give you an example of what not to do. My wife and I, we have five kids, so our kids are always having a tooth that needs to be pulled. They’re always needing to go to the doctor for something. It’s like there’s a constant injury, calamity, disease, dental, something going on.

Tim Redmond:

Last week in your life.

Clay Clark:

Last week, one of them had to have plastic surgery. There’s always something going on. Those bills can go like this unless, and we did this years ago, but what you do is you say, “Gosh, it seems random, but every few months, something weird happens, so let’s go ahead and just raise our monthly budget and spend a little more for insurance every month, so that way, those spikes aren’t quite as high.” If we don’t make an intentional plan, you end up reacting to a monster bill and then another monster bill and then another monster bill, but if we intentionally plan it and we say, “This is the budget we want to stick within every month,” and we go, how are we going to do this? We’re going to have to buy insurance and increase what it covers.

Tim Redmond:

That’s beautiful, Clay. You’re stabilizing your life where you don’t have to go up and down and all over. What happens, the closing the circle concept puts you into the boss’s seat instead of cash being the boss and you’re serving cash. I can’t do this, because I don’t have enough money. I can’t do this because of money. The money, money, money, money. We’re obsessed with this discussion and the creative view is not coming out. What this does is it really allows you to take that first principle and say, “I’m going to be the boss of my finances.”

Clay Clark:

Now, you talk about the annual event. What does that mean?

Tim Redmond:

Okay, what that is is, we are going to come together. We come together and we’re going to talk about, what do we want this year to look like? We’ve got goals for this year of how much income we’re going to start to bring in, go from a certain level, the increase that we want. Where do we want to do our giving? What do we want to give to? Giving is a big part of our life. What are some things we want to begin to save for? How are we going to, if we’re falling below, if our mandatory discretionary desired expenses, if that’s bigger than the income we’re bringing in, how are we going to work on bringing more income in? What can we creatively do? I will meet with my financial advisor that’s managing a number of my finances for me to get their feedback, but at the annual event, it’s really taking a look at the whole year, where we’re going to go with our money and how we’re going to get there.

Clay Clark:

You schedule a time to specifically sit down and be intentional about your planning.

Tim Redmond:

We’re going to do that.

Clay Clark:

Now, principle number five, be a giver. What does that have to do with, now, again, I’m just asking, devil’s advocate. If I’m watching this and I’m like, “Sure, be a giver.” Meanwhile, I’m trying to buy chicken panini to feed myself while I’m starting a business or if I’m barely just now making it. Maybe I’m watching this and I own a bakery and I’m just now starting to get ahead and you’re saying be a giver. Then I Google you, who’s Tim Redmond? I discover that you built a company from two people to 450 people. You travel all around the world. You’ve had a lot of success. I might look at it and go, “It’s easy for you to say to be a giver.” Walk me through, what does this mean to be a giver, and how does this apply to me if I’m maybe?

Tim Redmond:

Yeah. This is very, very important. When we talk about being a giver, it’s more of a mindset than an amount. Same thing as the next principle we’ll talk about. It’s more of a mindset than an amount. You live to give. What that is doing is, you are telling yourself on a conscious and a subconscious level that you are an abundant person and you’re not just striving just to survive, that you can learn to live below your means. There’s some aspect of your life that you can take out of what you have to give to somebody else that’s more needy than you are. There’s always somebody more needy than you in the world. You’re reinforcing that mindset of abundance. You’re reinforcing that mindset that you are a giver, you’re a creative giver. Being a giver is a whole attitude of life through your services, your creative problem solving, and through financially, even giving.

Clay Clark:

Are you intentional about giving? Are you intentional, or is this just now habitual for you, where you just do it out of habit?

Tim Redmond:

Yeah. I’m intentional in my giving over what we have set up. I believe in tithing. Now, I happen to give 10% to my church and they take care of all kinds of outreaches that I participate in, my kids and my wife and I participate in. There’s a lot of different programs, community affairs. There’s something you guys were involved with even today, it was just outstanding, earlier today. I’ll find different things. My wife and I will find different things we want to give to help support, to help those people. There’s intentionality there, but most of it’s just by rote. It’s like, this is in my lifestyle, it’s part of my budget. It’s part of my mandatory obligations.

Clay Clark:

I want to hammer this home real quick, though, because there’s somebody watching this who’s a crazy giver, like you are a nuclear giver. You will give everything possible. I met a lady years ago who was trying to start this home-based business, and every time she’d have a dollar, she would give it away, almost at a panicky, I need to give it away.

Tim Redmond:

It’s more fear driven than generosity driven.

Clay Clark:

Her story was, I grew up poor. I want to help people who are poor, always giving money to family. What we’re talking about is being intentional about what you’re giving, setting aside a specific amount. If you’re not familiar with the word tithe, and let’s just pretend that you’re not a Christian or you don’t believe in the Judeo-Christian worldview, the principle of tithing is setting aside 10% to give to a charitable cause. I would just argue, if you’re watching this, if you look up, if you just get a chance to research the life of John D. Rockefeller or Sam Walton or Russell Simmons, all different people, they all have a systematic approach to giving.

The sneaky part about giving is, when you give to somebody else, you actually feel better about yourself. It’s interesting. There’s a quote here that the infamous investor, Sir John Templeton, the founder of the Templeton Fund, said, “One thing we learned from these wise people is that giving is a test of maturity. Those who are truly grown up give. The immature do not. It is wise to practice giving in every area of life. Giving, happiness, prayer and mind power are four building blocks in the formation of a fulfilled existence on earth.” What is he talking about as it relates to giving there?

Tim Redmond:

Giving is really a whole attitude where you look at all of your life. Either you can be a consumer that’s just, it’s all about you, or you can look at yourself as the whole basis of this Power to Create book is your primary purpose is to create value, to serve other people. You’re living to give. As it relates to your financial management here, you want to set money aside, even though you may be that baker that’s just starting out. Then how in the world? I can hardly feed my kids and pay the bills. How can I be giving right now? It’s giving of the quality. That’s what Sir John Templeton’s talking about, giving the quality, making sure that your customers have an experience with you, but also, it’s good just to learn to live below your means where you’re putting money aside to give. It’s actually an expression of gratitude.

What giving does is, it reinforces in your mind that you are an abundant creator. You’re living from that place of contribution. You’re living from that place of abundance. Literally, when Jesus said it is more blessed to give than receive, and almost every great philosopher and world leader talks about the power of giving and living to give. We’re talking about how we’re wired as people that when you give, especially when you give with a sense of hilariousness or a positive mindset or really, this powerful emotional state, you’re literally tapping into the reward center of your brain that activates it. It creates these attachments that this is a good thing and it expands your mind to be able to see. You literally begin to look at problems as opportunities. You begin to expand your mind to look at life completely differently when you learn to live to give. I think that’s what John Templeton was talking about and the power of giving.

Clay Clark:

Now, Tim, you make a profound statement in your book called The Power to Create, where you say “Money reveals and magnifies what is in your heart.” What do you mean by that?

Tim Redmond:

Yeah, it’s a point where money magnifies. Okay, a lot of people will say, “Hey, listen, that person didn’t have a lot of money. They got a whole lot of money at one time. Money ruined them.” Did money ruin them or did money just reveal what was already in their heart? See, money magnifies. What we’re talking about here is, when we’re talking about managing our finances and putting money aside to be able to give, money is going to magnify your heart. Money is going to magnify your values. I can look at your credit card statement, I can look at your checkbook, I can look at your bank statement, and I’m going to see what you value here. I can see that money is carrying out your purposes. The discretionary money and the desired money, where you spend it on is going to let me see what’s really in your heart.

Clay Clark:

If you really peel into my financial statements, what you’ll notice is that I spend a huge amount of money on replica jerseys and not much on anything else.

Tim Redmond:

You spend a lot of money on those kinds of jerseys and you spend a lot of money on buying books.

Clay Clark:

That’s true. I’m a big book buyer.

Tim Redmond:

You buy books for yourself and you buy books for about 100 other people that you love or you want to eventually love, if they’ll read the book.

Clay Clark:

That’s true. It’s a conditional love. Read this book and then I’ll love you.

Robert Kiyosaki:

I learned at the Academy in Kings Point in New York, acta non verba. Watch what a person does, not what they say.

Clay Clark:

All right, Thrive Nation. On today’s show, we’re going to be breaking down what Robert Kiyosaki has recently been talking about. Robert Kiyosaki, the bestselling author, the New York Times bestselling author and real estate investment guru, has recently been talking more and more about acta non verba. You say, what’s acta non verba? One, it’s Latin, so don’t get too concerned there, but it’s, again, this is acta non verba. What it means is action. You need to watch what people do and not what they say.

Robert Redmond:

My name is Robert Redmond. I actually first met Clay almost three years ago to the day. I don’t know if he remembers it or not, but I wasn’t working with him at the time. I asked to see him and just ask him some questions to help direct my life, to get some mentorship. I’ve been working with Clay for now just over a year. The role I play here is a business coach, business consultant. I work with different businesses implementing best practice processes and systems that I have learned here by working with Clay.

The experience working here has, to put it real plainly, has been just life-changing. I have not only learned new things and have gained new knowledge, but I have gained a whole new mindset that I believe wherever I end up will serve me well throughout the rest of my life. Since working with Clay, I have learned so much. I would like to say almost everything about business in terms of the different categories. I haven’t learned it all, but I’ve learned all about marketing. I’ve learned about advertising. I’ve learned about branding. I’ve learned how to create a sales process for organizations in any industry. I’ve learned how to sell. I’ve learned how to create repeatable systems and processes and hold people accountable, how to hire people. It is almost like every aspect of a business you can learn, I have learned a lot in those different categories.

Clay Clark:

All right, Thrive Nation. On today’s show, we’re talking about this idea, this concept of, how do you make a million dollars a year? That’s the question. How do you make a million dollars a year? Let’s start with a better question, though. How do you make $100,000 dollars a year? Now, this is a true story, and on part two of today’s show, you’re going to hear about the subject of the story. All right, years ago, I ran into a man. I believe the man was in his 50s when he found me. I don’t want to get the years wrong. I think he was 50 when I met him. At the age of 50, a lot of people think, “I can’t be successful because I’m 50. I’m too old to be successful.” Now, this client didn’t have that mindset, but a lot of people think, “I can’t be successful because I’m too old.”

Other people think, “I can’t be successful because I’m too young.” Other people think, “I can’t be successful because I don’t have enough money saved.” Other people think, “I can’t be successful because the timing’s not right.” Other people say, “I can’t be successful because I don’t have kids yet. I’m not married yet. Maybe I can’t be successful because I am married. Maybe I can’t be successful because I have too many kids. I can’t be successful till after graduation, till before the graduation. I can’t be successful. The time’s just not right,” but Napoleon Hill, the bestselling author, he wrote a book called Think and Grow Rich, and that book absolutely changed my life. The book is called Think and Grow Rich. One of the lines in the book is he says, “The time will never be just right. You must act now,” so here’s the story I want to talk about today, and I want to get your thoughts on this.

Devon, a guy shows up in my life, 50 years old, and he saw me at a speaking event. I was speaking at Victory Christian Center. I was a speaker there and I was scheduled to speak before the man. After I spoke before the man, he heard me speak. Then afterwards, he said hello. He followed up with me. He followed up to reach out to me. He invited me out for pizza. Now, at the time I was, I want to say 32 because I’m 43. This would have been 10 years ago. I would have been 33 and he would’ve been 50. He reaches out to me and he says, “Hey, I would love it if you could teach me how to grow my business, because I always have between five and 20 clients.”

He says, “I’m a consultant and I always have between five and 20 clients. I’m always somewhere between five and 20 clients, and I want to grow a big business like you’ve built, and I want to know if you can teach me, so I want to get your thoughts on that.” Why don’t most people ask for help if their business is perpetually stuck?

Devon:

Probably just they’re just embarrassed.

Clay Clark:

They’re embarrassed?

Devon:

Yeah.

Clay Clark:

What do you think, Jordan? Why don’t most people ask? Because this guy, he’s 50 years old. I just spoke at Victory Christian Center. It was a crowd of maybe 75 or 100 people, and I was speaking on how to grow a successful company, and this guy who was the speaker who spoke after me, he had a book that he had written that wasn’t selling super well. He had a consulting business that had between five and 20 clients. It was always stuck. He didn’t know how to acquire new clients. Why won’t most people reach out for help, Jordan?

Jordan:

Probably because they either think, one, it’s like, “Oh, that’s great information. I don’t know how that applies to me.” They don’t know how to implement it, like the systems that you teach, or they’re not actually interested in growing. They just the idea of it, they like.

Clay Clark:

Again, without mentioning who this person is, on part two of today’s show, I’ll let everybody hear from this person, but without mentioning who this person is, I don’t want you guys to know that part of the story yet. Why do you think, Devon, that this person said, “Hey, I would like for you to help me. Please help me.” Why did this person call me and say, “Is there any way you could meet me for pizza? I want to meet you. Is there any way you could help me?” Why?

Devon:

You had a successful business and he knew you could help him.

Clay Clark:

Okay, I sit down with the person for pizza, sit down with them, this is a true story. Sit down with them for pizza. They’re asking me questions. “How’d you start your business? How’d you grow your business? How did you get your first client? How’d you get your next 10 clients? How’d you get your next 20 clients?” I’m just laying it out. Then we go for the, he says, “I want to become a client.” I said, “Sure.” He says, “What do you charge?” I tell him the fee. There’s a little bit of a pushback there, a little bit of a, oof. Now, why do I, Jordan, charge clients $1,700 a month? By the way, if you’re listing out there today, we do scholarships, too.

In this particular case, I ended up working with this guy at a discounted rate. I said, “As long as you pay me $750 dollars a month per consulting client that you add to your portfolio,” so you pay me $750 a month per new client that you add, I’ll work with you at a little bit of a below market rate, but every time you add a client, you’ll just pay me $750 a month. You add a new client for $2000 a month, you pay me $750 a month. You add a client for $3000 a month, you pay me $750 a month because my team, we could do photography, videography, web search engine. We have the workflow. We have the website optimization. We know how to do online ads. We know how to build sales systems, sales scripts. We know how to lead meetings. We know how to lead staff meetings. We know how to do the group interview process. We know hiring.

This guy didn’t know the group interview. He didn’t have the group interview, didn’t understand the idea of the group interview, didn’t know how to optimize websites, didn’t know how to do online ads, didn’t know how to do videography, didn’t know how to do photography, didn’t know how to make landing pages that convert, didn’t know how to do retargeting ads, did not know these things. Why do you think, Jordan, that this guy said, that deal makes sense?

Jordan:

That’s a lot of value, and it doesn’t matter. It’s what he needed. If it’s what he needs to do to grow his business, if that’s what it takes, then that’s a fair price.

Clay Clark:

Why would I, Devon, be willing to work with this client and tell this client, “Hey, you know what? I’ll be willing to work a little bit below rate as long as we have a signed agreement that you’ll pay me $750 per new client that you had.” Why would I say, “Yeah, I’ll teach you all my systems and you can use my staff if you pay me $750 per month?”

Devon:

Because you believe that you can help him and it’ll make you money.

Jordan:

It’s a win-win. That’s what it is.

Clay Clark:

Now, this is a true story. I want to be very clear. When this client, when I met this person at Victory Christian Center, and you’re going to hear them say in this video testimony that they always had between five and 20 clients, would it be shocking to you if we grew this person’s business to where they had 50 clients. We’re talking about $50,000. Again, they’re charging an average of $2,000 a client. Would it be shocking to you that this person’s business grew from five clients, five to 20 clients, to 50 clients? Would that be shocking to you, Devon?

Devon:

Knowing you, no, it’s not shocking. I believe it.

Clay Clark:

He talks about it. Okay, this is a real story. We’re growing the guy’s business, and I’ve helped him make all the scripts. I helped him learn the call recording process. I helped him learn how to train a team of sales professionals. Then he says to me, “Hey, I don’t have a team of callers. Could I use your callers?? Devon, why would I say, “Sure, you can use my callers,” knowing that I have a $750 a month ongoing. Every time he gets a new client, I make $750. Why would I say, “Sure, use my callers?”

Devon:

Your callers will make the calls and get the clients, and then that’s more money for you.

Clay Clark:

Now, this same client comes to me and says, “Hey, I don’t have an office to meet clients.” Jordan, why would I say, “Hey, you could office at my office for free?” By the way, I do that for Clay Stairs. For anybody out there that doesn’t know, Clay Stairs’ office is in my office and I charge him $0 a month to be in my office. Jordan, why would I say, “Sure, you could use my office space,” which by the way, at the time I was at the Riverwalk and my monthly rent or expense to be there, because it was a lease and you have utilities. I’m paying $20,000 a month to be in there. Why would I say, “You could be in my office for free?”

Jordan:

It’s still a win-win. If he grows, you grow.

Clay Clark:

Yeah. I said, “You could use my office for free. You could use my cold callers for free. You could use my physical office space.” Then the man says to me, “Hey, I don’t have any, now I’ve got so many consulting clients, I don’t have any other consultants that work for me. Could you train my consultants for me?” I’m giving the guy office space. I’m giving the guy my cold callers. We’re doing all the backend support. Why did I say, “Sure, I’ll train your consultants myself?” Why would I do that, Devon?

Devon:

The more consultants he gets, the more money you make. Then the more clients he gets, then the more money you make.

Clay Clark:

Right? Right. This client, he says, “Could you train my son?” I said, “Sure.” I let his son shadow me, ride with me. He rode with me in my vehicle. We drove to Farmer’s Insurance where the first meeting, he got a chance to shadow me training the insurance agents. He followed me to my office meetings with Face and Body. He followed me to all my client meetings. I let the client. Why would I, Jordan, mentor this man’s son, knowing that I make $750 per month per client?

Jordan:

That’s part of the deal. If you train him to do the same thing, you bring in more clients, you bring in more money, it’s the same thing. It’s a shalom relationship. They grow. You grow.

Clay Clark:

The win-win, the shalom.

Jordan:

Win-win.

Clay Clark:

Yeah. Now, if you’re out there listening today, and again, I’m telling you this story because there’s somebody out there that you’re like, “I’m too old to be successful. I’m too young. I’m too,” whatever the situation is. What happens is you have this mental block where you’re like, “The time’s not right.” Anyway, long story short, with this particular client, I’ll let him share part two of the show, part two of the story. I helped this guy grow his business to where he has 100 clients, 100 clients. We’re talking about a net monthly profit, every month a profit of over $50,000 a month this guy’s making. Now, if you’re making $50,000 a month, every two months, you’re making $100,000 dollars. Every six months, folks, think, follow the math here.

Every two months, you’re making $100,000 dollars. Every four months, you’re making $200,000. Every six months, you’re making $300,000. Think about, this is life-changing stuff here, and we do that all day. If you’re out there today and you feel like, “Man, I want to become successful,” you either have to learn from guesswork or you have to follow what’s been proven to work. I would recommend that everybody out there, you don’t run through the landmine of life. You’re not streaking through the minefield of life looking for solutions. A, I think streaking as a general rule is not the move, but streaking through the minefield of life, hoping that you find the right solutions doesn’t make any sense. Why not just follow a proven path? That’s why I do scholarships.

Let me explain how the scholarships work. I will work with a client. I’ll say, “Hey, you know what? $1,700 a month is what I charge, and we operate at a 20% margin, so it’s a $340 a month profit per client. However, I reserve the right, have the ability to, I will make the offer of, I’ll work with you at a discounted rate, and I’ll even let people like claystaires.com, and I’ll even let people like timredmond.com, and I’ll even let clients like d2branding.com. These are, look them up folks, claystaires.com, it’s C-L-A-Y-S-T-A-I-R-E-S.com, D2branding.com, the letter D, and then the number two, branding.com, redmondgrowth.com, redmondgrowth.com.

I’ll let these people office in my office for free because why would I do that, Devon? Why would I say, “Hey,” if I’m making a percentage of the revenue that you’re making, why would I say, “Sure, be in my office for free? Sure. Office at my office for free? Sure, I’ll staff your cold callers. Sure, I’ll do the group interview for you and find you employees for you. Sure, I’ll train your employees for you. Sure, you can shadow me and actually observe everything I do.” In fact, in the case of Mr. Redmond, we’re going to talk about him on part two of today’s show. I said, “You know what? Why don’t you just invite your new clients to my conference? That’s fine.” Why would I do that without charging this person’s clients?

Devon:

Doing that makes them grow and then that just makes you more money, so it makes sense.

Clay Clark:

You hit on it. I’m not trying to say that what you said isn’t accurate. I just want to hammer home what Jordan said. It’s a shalom. It’s a win-win. It’s the ultimate win-win, isn’t it? That’s the idea, the word shalom. Look it up, folks. It’s a win-win. It’s a biblical idea, but the client wins. I win, and it’s the move. Now, Jordan, whenever we do an onboarding for a new client, and I’ll do probably two or three of these today, two or three tomorrow, but we have, let’s say, a dozen people a week that reach out for coaching.

Jordan:

Yep.

Clay Clark:

There’s usually one or two a week. I offer a free 13 point assessment. Why would I do a free 13 point assessment with anybody who wants to work with us or who’s thinking about working with us? Why would I do a free 13 point assessment?

Jordan:

One, knowing it’s free, so people will do it, but you have to see, one, if they’re a good fit for the program and if they’ll do the work, and two, if [inaudible 01:03:18].

Clay Clark:

Okay. Why are the vast majority of people not a good fit? I’m sure if you’re listening right now, I’m sure you’re a great fit, but why, Devon, are the vast majority of people not a good fit? Would I do the group? Why would I do the weekly 13 point assessments with this large group of potential candidates? Why would I do these 13 point assessments for free, knowing that the vast majority of the people that fill out the form are not a good fit?

Devon:

Before they become a client and pay the monthly fee, you have to know if they’re willing to do the work.

Clay Clark:

Right. If they are, then that’s a good fit. Then as far as the fee, I don’t even really worry. I’m not going to work for free, but I do scholarships for anybody who has the mental capacity and the tenacity needed.

PART 2 OF 5 ENDS [01:04:04]

Clay Clark:

… For anybody who has the mental capacity and the tenacity needed to do the work. That’s why you see all the time, we had a client here recently, I said, “Hey, why don’t you come shadow me? You can come to my office in Tulsa and see what I do before…” Because this client was passionate about paying me. I won’t mention their name or their industry, but this person recently shadowed me. They brought their team with them, and they were passionate about hiring me. They’re like, “We want to hire you.” And why did I say, “Devin, why don’t you just come to Tulsa and shadow me, watch what I do, watch how I work with our 160 clients, watch how we help them grow, look at these clients, go to ThriveTime Show, look at the testimonials, see the massive growth?” Why would I do that, and again, it’s a month to month relationship to start, why would I have someone shadow before I decide to take them on?

Devin:

Because they are able to see the environment here and the work, and it helps them realize, “Okay, this is going to be me. Actually, nevermind, I don’t want to work with you. This is too much for me.” It kind of gives them that chance.

Clay Clark:

There it is, but it’s a proven path.

Devin:

Yep.

Clay Clark:

So now, we move on. So now, Jordan, you watch this. When I tell a client, “Okay, yeah. You are a good fit.” If they are a good fit, if they go to ThriveTimeShow.com, ThriveTimeShow.com, they do a 13 point assessment, I think they’re a good fit, they think they’re a good fit, why would I say, “Hey, today’s the 18th. Let me charge you a dollar today to reserve your spot, and then, we’re not going to even charge you that monthly recurring fee of $1,700 a month. Or if it’s a scholarship, that recurring fee of 750 a month, we won’t even charge you that until the first?” Why would I give them that first couple of weeks free?

Jordan:

Because you want to make sure that they actually want to do it, instead of in their excitement and being hyped up, they’re like, “Oh yeah, yeah, sign me up. I want to do it.” And then, a week later, they’re like, “Oh wait, I can’t do it.”

Clay Clark:

So on today’s show, it’s going to be like the ultimate testimonial. You’re going to have a client that’s going to explain to you, I worked with this client for, I think, eight years, nine years, and they’re going to explain how they doubled their business every single year. Then you’re going to have this client, this client, Tim Redmond, you’re going to hear his son explain how I actually taught his son everything about business. His son will say this, and you’re going to go, “So you gave this guy free office space, you taught his son, you let your cold callers make call for the guy’s business, you helped the guy make the call scripts, his website, his print pieces, his marketing materials, you even taught him his core product and service. You let him office there for free. You let him attend your conferences for free, and you let his clients attend the conference for free. Why would you do that?”

Well, because a win-win, you tell your client, and why would I, before I have anybody sign a contract, Jordan, before I have someone sign the contract, why would I give it to them and say, “Please read this with the assistance of an attorney,” before you… Because I don’t like to do a contractual agreement with most people, but if it’s somebody who’s on a scholarship or it’s somebody who we’re going to work with and really help them scale, I like to get a contract, so that way, it’s a contractually binding, like, “Hey, we’re going to help you scale.” That’s how I generate a lot of wealth is helping people scale their business. Why would I say, “Please take the contract. Do not sign it today. Take it home, run it by your attorney. At least look at it for least seven days before you sign it?” Why would I do that?

Jordan:

Because most people aren’t sure about what they want to do, so you give them a chance to look it over and make sure they want to do it. Because if they don’t want to do it, you don’t want to sign them up.

Clay Clark:

Devin, why would I say, “Hey, Devin, you want to become a longtime partner client, that’s exciting. I’m going to charge you,” in this case of Tim Redmond, “$750 per month per client for forever. Every time you land a client, I’m going to charge you $750 per client to use my systems and processes?” Why would I say, “Please read that agreement eyes wide open, read it, run it by an attorney before you sign it?” Why would I do that?

Devin:

Because when you first give them a contract, they’re pumped, they’re excited, and then, if you give them some time to think about it, so they really understand, hey, this is forever. So no matter if you have 50 clients…

Clay Clark:

It’s like a mortgage.

Devin:

Yeah, a mortgage, yeah.

Clay Clark:

And the word, “mortgage,” by the way means death grip. So I’m just saying I’m not going to enter into an agreement with somebody unless I really want to be in the win-win shalom relationship. So on part two of today’s show, you’re going to hear this incredible success story of how we helped to grow Redmond Growth. I think it’s going to be a blasty blast, but I think it might be better if you hear it in their own words. This is Tim Redmond and Robert Redmond from RedmondGrowth.com. Again, that’s Tim Redmond and Robert Redmond from Redmond Growth. You can hear their own words. It’s an incredible success story. Hopefully, it pumps you up, folks, and if you’re out there today and you feel like the time might not be right to grow your business, I would encourage you that the time is never right.

You must act now. To quote Napoleon Hill, the time will never be just right. You must act now. And so, I would encourage you, you got one of three ways we can help you today. One, you can go to ThriveTimeShow.com and book a ticket for our in-person workshop, where we tell people it’s $250 or whatever price you can afford to pay. What a good deal. Second option is you could schedule a 13 point assessment. Maybe you need a checkup from the neck up to see if we can help you. That’s okay. That’s ThriveTimeShow.com, and you get your free checkup from the neck up, a 13 point assessment. Or option three is we offer the one-on-one business consulting, business coaching. It is going to be an exciting show. I’m so fired up for everybody to hear it. Devin, Jordan, I appreciate you guys.

You’re here every day helping clients grow their business, and I just thought it would help for the folks out there to know these are real stories. These are not holograms. These are not get rich quick schemes. This is a client who we worked with over like an eight year period of time, and you’re going to hear the progression over an eight year relationship. And hopefully, it does encourage everybody out there that this is your year, this is your time. The time will never be just right. You must act now. Now, without any further ado, we’re going to end this part one with a boom, because BOOM stands for big, overwhelming, optimistic momentum. Again, BOOM stands for big, overwhelming, optimistic momentum. Here we go, 3, 2, 1, BOOM. We go back eight years ago. Think about the number of clients you had back then versus the number of clients you have now. As a percentage, what has been the growth over the past eight years, do you think? We got to inspire somebody out there who just doesn’t have the time to listen to your calls.

Tim Redmond:

Okay, so Clay, it’s like I would go up and down from about $10,000 a month up to about 40,000, but it’s up and down roller coaster. And so, now, we’ve got it to where we’re in excess of a hundred clients.

Clay Clark:

That’s awesome.

Tim Redmond:

And so, I would have anywhere from five clients to 20 clients on my own with networking, but I had no control over it. I didn’t. Without the systems, you’re going to be victimized by your own business.

Clay Clark:

For somebody out there who struggles with math, let’s say that your average number of clients was 30, and you go to a hundred, as a percentage, what is that?

Tim Redmond:

I have doubled every year since working with you. So I’ve doubled in clients. I’ve doubled in revenue every year. That’s a hundred percent growth every year I’ve worked with. Now, so we’ve been good friends seven, eight years, and I’ve got doubled five times.

Clay Clark:

Which is just incredible. The first time you do it, that’s one thing, but when you do it repeatedly, that’s unbelievable.

Tim Redmond:

We’re working our blessed assurance off this year to double, we’re planning on doubling again. We’re incorporating some new things in there to really help us do it, but we are going to double again this year. I started coaching… But it would go up and down, Clay. That’s when I came to you, as I was going up and down, and I wanted to go up and up, instead of up and down. And so, that’s when it needed a system. So creating a system is you have nailed down specific steps that you’re going to take, no matter how you feel, no matter the results, you lean into them, and you do them regardless of what’s happening. You lean into them, and it will give you X number of leads. You follow up with those leads, turns into sales.

Well, I tell you, if you don’t have a script and you don’t have a system, then every day is a whole new creation. You’re creating a lot of energy just to figure out what are you going to do. And the best executives, Peter Drucker is a father of modern management, and he said, “The most effective executives make one decision a year.” What you do is you make a decision, what is your system, and then, you work like the dickens to make sure you follow that system. And so, that’s really what it’s all about. So with a script here, we have a brand new gal that just came in working for us, she nailed down the script, and she’s been nailing down appointments. Usually, we try to get one appointment for every 100 calls. We make two to 300 calls a day per rep, and she’s been nailing down five and eight appointments a day on that script.

Clay Clark:

Somebody out there is having a hard time… She’s making how many calls a day?

Tim Redmond:

She’s making between two and 300 calls a day.

Speaker 3:

Whoa.

Clay Clark:

Our relationship is weird in that we do, if someone were to buy an Apple computer today, or let’s say you bought a personal computer, a PC, the computer is made by, let’s say, Dell, but then the software in the computer would be Microsoft, let’s say, or Adobe or whatever that is. So I basically make the systems, and you’re like the computer and I’m like the software. It’s kind of how I would describe our relationship. Tim, I want to ask you this. You and I reconnected, I think it was in the year 2000 and what was it? Maybe 2010, is that right? 2011 maybe, or maybe further down the road. Maybe 2013?

Tim Redmond:

2012.

Clay Clark:

Okay, so 2012, and at that time, I was five years removed from the DJ business. And you were how many years removed from tax and accounting software?

Tim Redmond:

It was about 10, 11 years.

Clay Clark:

How did we remeet? What was the first interaction? There was some interaction where you and I first connected. I just remember that somehow you and I went to Hideaway Pizza, but do you remember when we first reconnected?

Tim Redmond:

Yeah, well, we had that speaking thing that…

Clay Clark:

Oh, there it was. So it was Victory Christian Center, I was speaking there.

Robert Redmond:

My name is Robert Redmond. I actually first met Clay almost three years ago to the day, I don’t know if he remembers it or not, but I wasn’t working with him at the time. I asked to see him and just asked him some questions to help direct my life to get some mentorship. But I’ve been working with Clay for now just over a year. The role I play here as a business coach, business consultant, I work with different businesses implementing best practice processes and systems that I have learned here by working with Clay. And the experience working here has, to put it real plainly, has been just life changing. I have not only learned new things and have gained new knowledge, but I have gained a whole new mindset that I believe, wherever I end up, will serve me well throughout the rest of my life.

Since working with Clay, I have learned so much, I would like to say almost everything about business, in terms of the different categories, I haven’t learned it all, but I’ve learned all about marketing. I’ve learned about advertising. I’ve learned about branding. I’ve learned how to create a sales process for organizations in any industry. I’ve learned how to sell. I’ve learned how to create repeatable systems and processes and hold people accountable, how to hire people. It’s almost like every aspect of a business you can learn I have learned a lot in those different categories, and then, again, the mindset that I’ve gained here has been huge. Working here, you can’t be a mediocre person. You are a call to a higher standard of excellence, and then, as you’re called to that standard here, you begin to see those outcomes in every area of your life, that standard of excellence that you want to implement, no matter what you’re involved in.

I would like to describe the other people that work with Clay are people that are going somewhere with their life. Marshall in the group interview talks about how the best fits for this organization are the people that are goal oriented, so they’re on their own trajectory and we’re on our own trajectory. And the best fits are those people where there can be a mutually beneficial relationship that, as we pursue our goals and we help the business pursue those goals, the business helps us pursue our goals as well. And so, I’d say people that are driven, people that want to make something of their lives, people that are goal oriented, they’re focused, and they’re committed to overcoming any adversity that may come their way. Clay’s passion for helping business owners grow their businesses is it’s unique in that, I don’t know if there’s anyone else’s that can be as passionate.

Whenever a business starts working with Clay, it’s almost as like Clay is running that business, in the sense that he has something at stake. He’s just serving them. They’re one of his clients, but it’s as if he is actively involved in the business. Whenever they have a win, he’s posting it all over his social media, he’s shouting it across the room here at Thrive. He’s sending people encouraging messages. He can kind of be that life coach and business coach, in terms of being that a motivator and that champion for people’s businesses. It’s again unique, because there’s no one else I’ve seen get so excited about and passionate about other people’s businesses. The kind of people that wouldn’t like working with Clay are people that are satisfied with mediocrity, people that want to get through life by just doing enough, by just getting by, people who are not looking to develop themselves, people who are not coachable, people who think that they know it all, and they’re unwilling to change.

I would say those are the type of people. In short, anyone that’s content with mediocrity would not like working with Clay. So if you’re meeting Clay for the first time, the advice I’d give you is, definitely, come ready to take tons of notes. Every time Clay speaks, he gives you a wealth of knowledge that you don’t want to miss. I remember the first time that I met Clay, I literally carried a notebook with me all around. I was looking at this notebook the other day actually. I carried a notebook with me all around, and I just took tons of notes. I filled the entire notebook in about three or four months, just from being around Clay, following him, and learning from him. And then, I would say, come coachable. Be open to learning something new. Be open to challenging yourself. Be open to learning and adjusting parts about you that need to be adjusted.

Adam:

My name’s Adam Beal, and I’m the vice president of PHONEDOCTORS. I’ve been with PHONEDOCTORS for four years now. We’ve been doing work with Clay for the past year. The exciting part was is that I got it after about two, probably after about the second meeting, I understood, when I came back in and he was wearing the exact same thing, it was like, “Okay, I understand why he’s doing this now, because I’ve seen so many other successful people model the same thing.” The $2,000 a monthly fee is completely a no brainer, as long as you embrace the system, because you will see the results. What’s great is, when I’m in my stores now and I hear people come into my store and they say, “Hey, are you, Jose?” And my manager says, “Yes I am.” They say, “Well, we’re here because of the Google review that we saw on your Google page.”

And when I hear that, I know what we’re being taught and what we’re executing is working, because I’ve never heard that before when I would go into the stores. Clay’s helped us a lot with our Google reviews, as I’ve spoken to. They help us with our Google pages as well, making sure that they’re up to date. Anytime we need new pictures taken care of, his team goes out, does that for us. They take great care of our AdWords, and we have them writing AdWords and different types of content, writing more content and articles for our webpage, which is driving more and more traffic through our webpage, which in turn is also leading more customers into our stores. Clay’s team has also helped us look at different ways to challenge our stores, through simple things, such as adding on additional upsell items, that have no cost of goods related to it.

So it’s a pure profit transaction. We just recently implemented an urgent repair, that many customers have asked for in the past, but we just didn’t stop and take time to think about it. Clay has challenged us to come up with an idea. He’d been thinking about our business. We implemented it, and now, all of a sudden, we’re seeing more and more people utilize this urgent repair that gets their repair done in 30 minutes or less. And if we don’t meet that time, then they don’t pay anything else. But we’re seeing revenues generate through small little key items, such as that. The greatest focus we’ve had is in upselling and trying to figure out different ways to take customers that we have and increase the profitability through them. Even though we see transactions being increased, the ability to take something as simple as a protection plan that we’ve implemented, implementing the urgent repair, and continuing to look for new ways to generate revenue off the customers that you currently have, while letting them, the Thrive team, drive more customers into your stores.

So not only are you getting more customers coming into your store, but he’s giving you key ways to actually improve the quality of sale, once those customers come in. Some of the moves and tips that Clay’s team at Thrive15 have taught us is to focus on the upsell more than anything. We’ve implemented new urgent repair that allows customers to come in, and if they’re in a hurry, they pay a small fee to get that repair moved to the front of the line. We get it done in 30 minutes or less, and if we don’t meet that, then they don’t pay anything. We’ve also focused more on our protection plans and driving those results, which is a simple add-on as well. And that has led to much more revenue for us, because of our redemption rate. Last year, we saw our sales transactions improve 3% over the previous year.

In talking with other retailers in our market, none of them saw that, which was incredibly exciting to us. We just got back from CES about two weeks ago, and we were able to find out, from about 15 other independent mobile device companies, that they all saw down trends last year. And we were very excited to see how well we did last year, because we saw our profits and transactions all go up last year. All right, through Clay’s team here at Thrive15, they have taken aggressive a step at really helping us improve our search engine optimization through content and writing articles, as well as through challenging us in the process of improving our Google reviews.

We’ve seen all of our stores in both markets, the Arkansas and Oklahoma market, all go to the top of the Google listings. Anytime you search any type of mobile device repair, cell phone repair, we are at the top, every single city, which is great, because we’ve seen that that’s where customers are going to. When they’re going to find somebody that they want to trust, they’re going through Google to see what your rating is, to see how many reviews you have.

And it is so, so important to make sure that you get that first mark of 50 reviews, then you got to challenge yourself to get to that 100. Every single location of ours has over 100 reviews, except for two new ones that we’ve opened, and we continue to see them go even further and further. So the goal is to take our competition and make them not want to play in that game. And we’ve done that. Clay, his team in Thrive, is not only just a marketing company, they’re coaches as well, which is great. So many times through my 25 year career in retail, I’ve encountered people like Clay and his team and just never have really got the buy-in. But with Clay and his team, they’re genuine.

They break it down. They make it simple. They’ve got a proven track record, and you walk in and you see the businesses that they’ve developed. And it makes it so much easier to really just buy in to the program. The weekly meetings are very structured. You start on time and you finish on time, and you’re expected to come prepared with the topics that you were giving last week. If you show up and you’re not prepared, the meeting could end very quickly, because you’re not doing what you’ve committed to.

And that’s the great thing about it is he keeps you on course, he keeps you focused, and you see the results, if you do what you’re asked to do. I never thought I would need a business coach, life coach, but it’s great now to, every week, when I’m talking to people, to say, “I’m going to see my business coach this morning,” and they look at me. And all of a sudden, there’s questions being asked, and we’ve even recommended people and had them come and join the Thrive team, which has been pretty exciting for me as well. Because I believe in it and I would never recommend them to a good friend unless I knew it could help.

Robert Kiyosaki:

I learned at the Academy, in King’s Point in New York, acta non verba, watch what a person does, not what they say.

Clay Clark:

All right, Thrive nation. On today’s show, we’re going to be breaking down what Robert Kiyosaki has recently been talking about. Robert Kiyosaki, the bestselling author, the New York Times bestselling author, and real estate investment guru, has recently been talking more and more about acta non verba. You say, “What’s acta non verba?” Well, one, it’s Latin, so don’t get too concerned there. But it’s acta, again, it’s acta non verba. What it means is action, you need to watch what people do and not what they say. That’s the idea. Watch what somebody does and not what they says.

Ryan Wimpey:

Hi, I’m Ryan Wimpey.

Rachel Wimpey:

And I’m Rachel Wimpey, and the name of our business is Tip Top K9.

Ryan Wimpey:

Our business is a dog training business. We help people with behavioral issues and teach their dog how to listen. When I was learning to become a dog trainer, we didn’t learn anything about internet marketing or advertising or anything at all, just dog training. And that’s what’s so great about working with Clay and his team, because they do it all for us.

Rachel Wimpey:

So that we can focus on our passion, and that’s training dogs. Clay and his team here, they’re so enthusiastic, their energy is off the charts, never a dull moment here at Thrive.

Ryan Wimpey:

We’ve been working with Clay and his team for the last five months, two of which have been our biggest months ever, one our biggest gross by 35%. Clay’s helped us make anything from brochures to stickers, new business cards, new logos, scripts for phones, script for emails, script for text message, scripting for everything.

Rachel Wimpey:

How I would describe the weekly meetings with Clay and his team are awesome. They’re so effective. It’s worth every minute. Things get done. We’ll ask for things, like different flyers, and they’re done before our hour’s up. So it’s just awesome, extremely effective.

Ryan Wimpey:

If you don’t use Clay and his team, you’re probably going to be pulling your hair out or you’re going to spend half of your time trying to figure out the online marketing game and producing your own flyers and marketing materials or print materials, all this stuff like that. You’re really losing a lot, as far as lost productivity and lost time, not having a professional do it, that has a real sense of urgency and that actually knows what they’re doing, when you already have something that’s your core focus that you already know how to do.

Rachel Wimpey:

You would also be missing out with all the time and financial freedom that you would have working with Clay and his team.

Ryan Wimpey:

We would recommend Clay and his team to other business owners, because they need to be working on their business, not just trying to figure out the online game, which is complex and changing daily. So no one has a marketing team too. Most people don’t. They can’t afford one. And their local web guy or local person that they know probably can’t do everything that a whole team and a whole floor of people can do in hours and not just weeks or months. There’s a definite sense of urgency with Clay and his team. I used to have to ride other web people, I mean really ride them to get stuff done. And stuff is done so fast here, and people, there’s a real sense of urgency to get it done. It’s great.

Clay Clark:

All right, Thrive nation. On today’s show, we’re interviewing a real entrepreneur that’s having real success. Now, again, Robert Kiyosaki talks about it all the time, but Robert Kiyosaki, the bestselling author of Rich Dad Poor Dad, he’s been on our show, I’ve been on his show. He talks about how, at the end of the day, it’s about what you do, not what you say. You need to watch what people do, not what they say. And so, if you’re out there today and you’re saying, “My business is stuck, I don’t know if I have what it takes to grow it,” I hope you find a lot of encouragement from today’s guest. Because he is a very normal person, he’s a diligent doer, and he’s somebody who reached out and we’ve been able to help him grow his business. And I’m super excited to have him on today’s show.

Sean, tell us who we’re interviewing on today’s show, sir.

Sean:

So this is Cody Ellis, the owner of Tri Peak Construction, based out of Reno, Nevada, who has been with us for about one year and grown his company by 107%, using a whole bunch of things that we helped him implement, that we can talk about today.

Clay Clark:

All right, Cody Ellis, welcome on to the ThriveTime Show. How are you, sir?

Cody Ellis:

I’m doing great. Thanks for having me on.

Clay Clark:

So how did you originally hear about the ThriveTime Show or the business growth coaching that we provide?

Cody Ellis:

A friend of mine with OSS, Organized Stores Solutions, recommended you. At the time, he kind of gave me the breakdown of what you guys did. And it was a lot of money at the time when we were talking about it, but me and my wife discussed it. She’s my CFO, and we decided to give you guys a shot.

Tim Redmond:

Well, what I’m going to do is I’m going to pull this up, so our listeners can see this. Because I think this helps put a little bit of visual meat on the bone, so to speak, here. When we work with clients to help them grow their business, we walk people through what is a 14 step linear workflow. And for clients, sometimes, they might not think about it this way, but this is how I look at it, is it’s almost like puzzle pieces that have to come together. And if we do it right, out comes a successful company. And so, we charge people $1,700 a month to help out our clients. That’s what we charge, $1,700 a month, and we operate at a 20% profit margin. We make $340 a month per a client. I’d like to ask you, with your business, can you tell the listeners out there, what exactly do you do? And what’s your website, so people can prove you’re not a hologram?

Cody Ellis:

My name’s Tri Peak Construction and Design. I’ve been building a franchise called Rocket Fizz Soda Pop and Candy Shop since 2008. I didn’t get my California contractor’s license till 2015, when the franchise went on Undercover Boss. And ever since then, I’ve been mainly doing it, these franchise buildouts all over the United States. 2020, work got slow, and pretty much, I have been relying on other work to get me jobs and I wasn’t getting good jobs. I was just kind of scrambling. And this year, I kind of finally figured it out, because you guys helped me organize my whole company. I felt like I was floating, not going anywhere, struggling, angry. I feel like I have a good strong foundation right now. That’s where you guys helped me.

Clay Clark:

Well, it’s interesting you say that, and I appreciate you being so honest about it, because I know a lot of people, a lot of my wonderful clients, we have one client in particular I’m picking up right now, he lost an incredible amount of weight over the last year. And I saw the guy, and I said, “Man, you look great.” And he goes, “Well, I have a business coach that helps me grow my business. So I figured I should probably have a fitness coach.” And the fitness coach got him on a diet that made sense and a workout plan that made sense. And he really had tremendous transformation. So if you’re out there today and you feel stuck, don’t feel stuck, but there’s a linear path you have to go down.

And if you go to TriPeakConstruction.com, TriPeakConstruction.com, you can see the website, but there’s a linear path you have to go down to grow your business. And we’ll walk you through this folks, if you’re listening out there today, you can do it. So first off, you have to establish your revenue goals. Now, I’m not going to ask you on the show here what your revenue goals are, but do you, in your mind, have revenue goals at this point? Do you have those kind of solidified in your mind there, sir?

Cody Ellis:

Yes.

Clay Clark:

Okay.

Cody Ellis:

Me and my wife, we do. Go ahead.

Clay Clark:

No, I didn’t mean to cut you off.

Cody Ellis:

We do a breakdown. We do a breakdown like our goals this year. Right now, mine’s getting more employees. That’s going to be my next step. I have my office, I do have a couple independent contractors, but finding good solid employees that I can keep busy all the time is definitely going to be my goal this year.

Clay Clark:

And if we look at your website, you actually do remodeling, and you do a good job. But let me pull this up, so people can see this here. People pay you to actually go in there and to remodel and do construction, and you do a good job at TriPeakConstruction.com. Now, again, I’m not asking you on this show, but as I mentioned to our listeners, we operate at a 20% margin. So if I charge someone $1,700 a month to grow their business, I make a $340 a month profit. In your case, do you have in your mind what that profit percentage should be there, sir? I’m not trying to ask you the specific number, but when you do jobs now, do you have a better understanding, you and Sean, as far as the profit you’re making per job, I guess?

Sean:

Yeah, we’ve [inaudible 01:35:57] the job audit system, which is allowing us to make course corrections, project to project, when it comes to a…

PART 3 OF 5 ENDS [01:36:04]

Sean:

Make course corrections project to project when it comes to our profit, but I think your gross profit per job was somewhere around 30% this year. Does that sound right?

Cody Ellis:

Yeah. My local jobs, I average around 30% profit and then the franchise jobs I average about 60% to 70%.

Clay Clark:

And the reason why I mention this is so many people feel bad about being profitable and I always tell people we charge people $1,700 a month to grow their business and we make a $340 a month profit and people that come to our office, they meet our graphic designers, our photographers, our web developers, our online ad folks, our consultants and they go, “Wow, there’s 45 people that work here. Oh, that’s where the money goes.” Because everybody who works here gets paid and we do all of that for that monthly fee that we charge.

Now as far as box three, determining the number of hours that you work per week, I know you and Sean have helped to design a schedule. That’s always changing. It’s always in flux. With every client we have, they’re always optimizing their schedule. We move on to box four, defining your unique value proposition. Did you and Sean work together to register your Google map and optimize the website there, Cody? Did you guys work on that together?

Cody Ellis:

Yes. So my company was based out of my home and I realized that Google doesn’t… I’m a general contractor working out of my home. Doesn’t look very professional. And he coached me and pushed me to get an office, pretty much the first part of our coaching and it’s helped me tremendously.

Clay Clark:

Now what happens is… For anybody that doesn’t know, I’m going to give five examples rapid fire so people can see this. Okay, so we’re going to do a search right now. We’re going to type in carpet cleaning quotes. And this is a brand… Full disclosure. I’ve worked with OxyFresh to help them grow their business and anybody out there that buys an OxyFresh, I make $5,000 every time we sell one. Okay? So we’ve sold over 400 OxyFresh franchises. And here’s the secret sauce here. There’s many things we do, but we have 274,000 Google reviews. We’re the highest reviewed company on the planet right now. So if you type in carpet cleaning quotes, we come up top in the search results.

If you go to Joplin gyms… Full disclosure, just so we’re clear, each one of these gyms I make about $300 a month per gym they have open. Okay, so just to be clear, they’ve got six gyms now open, so I make about $300 per month per gym they have open. So you type in Joplin gyms. Look, Colaw Fitness has 10,000 Google reviews. I mean wow. Okay. And am I biased to endorse them and promote them? Absolutely. Why? Because I get about $300 per gym they open.

Let’s look at this one. Let’s type in Tulsa men’s haircuts. And I’m just giving a lot of examples. And for all of these you have to have a registered verified Google map and you have to have an authorized website. There we are coming up top again and we don’t come up top in the search results because I’m a good guy. We come up top in the search results because we’re following a good system.

And I think that’s one of the struggles that I’ve had in my life is to see great people like you Cody, who have a business that’s not ranking and I have a passion to help them get more leads, but yet the client sometimes doesn’t want to do the things needed to succeed. I’m like, “I need you to get a Google map and to have an optimized website.” And the client… Not you, but certain clients will say, “Yeah, but my sister made the website on Wix and she spent all weekend on it and I office out of my house and I don’t want to register a Google map and my cousin made the video and I don’t want to change it, because I don’t want to offend him. And my husband made the online ads and my wife did this.” And they’re like… They’re loyal to dysfunction. What would you say to anybody out there as far as how it’s impacted your business having an optimized website and optimized Google Map?

Cody Ellis:

My phone rings off the hook. I have a hard time keeping up with all the calls I get.

Clay Clark:

That is the move. Okay, so we move on. We’re looking at the system here. This is again… Someone says, “Well, what’s the secret sauce?” Well, this is like Sean having a menu, me sitting down with a skilled man or woman who’s a cook, and I go, “What’s the secret ingredient that makes these cookies so great? Tell me now.” And they go, “Well, you got to have all the ingredients.” “Yeah, but tell me the one. Tell me the one.” “Well, if you don’t have eggs, you’re screwed. You don’t have flour, you’re screwed. You don’t have chocolate chips, there’s no chocolate chips in the chocolate chip cookies.” “Oh yeah, but tell me the what.” That’s how a lot of people want to do it. It’s not one thing, it’s a puzzle. It comes together. And what we do with business growth is it’s like bumper bowling for business. We make sure you don’t throw gutter balls. All right.

So improving the branding, we talked about that, optimizing the website. If you’re out there today and you feel overwhelmed, don’t feel overwhelmed. We will help you. Three-legged marketing stool. Sean, you guys have worked to create a three-legged marketing stool and a lead tracking system so that you actually track the leads. Correct. That come in. I want to get Cody’s take and then your take on this, Sean Cody, how has it helped you having a tracking sheet where the leads are coming in from?

Cody Ellis:

That’s huge. Sean has helped me. I mean, like I said, I was floating around writing it on a piece of paper. I’ll lose the paper. Now that I have an actual tracking sheet and I can see last month where… Or last year, it’s 100% helped me.

Clay Clark:

I don’t use the word life-changing lightly. I don’t just throw out, “Oh, that’s life-changing.” But there are a few things in my life that are life-changing. I give you an example, when I read Rich Dad, Poor Dad. That book changed my life. [inaudible 01:41:42] book changed my life. It really did. When I married my wife, the one thing about my wife that I found that… It’s wonderful for me and my life is my wife is an incredible mom. I mean just an awesome mom. Does a great job with the kids and she’s also very faithful, very loyal, and there’s just certain benefits to being married. He who finds a great wife finds a great thing. I mean, it’s a powerful… It’s a biblical concept. But you could also have a bad life change. You could also find the wrong woman. You can find the wrong business consultant. You can read the wrong book. And that’s the danger of taking advice from people that don’t know what they’re doing.

Now we have at Thrivetimeshow.com, if you go to the website now, as of today, almost twenty-one hundred video testimonials from wonderful people.

I got to ask you, even though your friend referred you Cody, did you go to Thrive Time Show and look at some of the testimonials-

Cody Ellis:

Yes.

Clay Clark:

Or was that sort of your path a little bit before you decided to call us?

Cody Ellis:

I actually bought your book. Start Here with the Marlboro Red. So that’s where I started with you. I’m not much of a podcaster myself, but I have been… Sean’s been texting me links to watch and listen to. But…

Clay Clark:

That’s [inaudible 01:42:59]-

Cody Ellis:

Your book is where…

Clay Clark:

And just so you know, my mom will probably watch this, but the reason why I made the cigarette Marlboro cover was that I believe entrepreneurship is something that is dangerous and it’s addictive. Meaning that I know a lot of people, they get addicted to the idea of entrepreneurship and they go from one failed idea to the next. And I know of other people that are into it and they succeed. And entrepreneurship, it’s an addictive thing. It can be dangerous if you don’t know what you’re doing. So again, I’m glad you read that book.

And we move on. The call script. You guys have worked on a call script. Sean, what happens when a client you’re working with, when you give them [inaudible 01:43:37] mentorship, but they will not. Do tracking and they will not use a script, what happens?

Sean:

Well, at first it makes it very difficult for me to help them because really we don’t actually know what’s going on in the business.

Clay Clark:

There it is.

Sean:

That’s the main thing that happens there.

Clay Clark:

And again, I just want people to see this. Again, if you go to my newest book, A Millionaire’s Guide. Again, it’s called a Millionaire’s Guide. You can download it for free at Thrivetimeshow.com… Thrivetimeshow.com/millionaire. You can download it for free. It’s A Millionaire’s Guide. The reason why I wrote this is because… I don’t know, I don’t know of a lot of people that know what they’re talking about. And so I felt like people needed a guide on how to become sustainably wealthy, not like a get-rich-quick scheme. And in that book, I talk a lot about this, and specifically on page five, you got to have a call script, you got to have recorded calls, got to have a one sheet, got to have pre-written emails, got to have a lead tracker. You guys are doing that.

Now, once you do a good job, you got to make sure you’re tracking your expenses and your income. Now, from what I understand is that Cody’s been super coachable on that tracking the income and the expenses. Cody, has that been helpful for you to be intentional about tracking income and expenses?

Cody Ellis:

100%. We wouldn’t know how much I was profiting without that. I mean, that was huge. Materials.

Clay Clark:

Materials.

Cody Ellis:

I was losing a little bit of money on materials and not charging enough. And I seem to go above and beyond with my customers as far as little things. People try to take advantage, but you just got to do it and then I’ll just keep getting more referrals from them.

Clay Clark:

Yeah, many other things that we do together… I mean we run the online ads, we help with the online reputation management. You do a great job of gathering objective reviews from your happy customers. We manage the online ads. There’s a lot of other things that we do with you each and every week, but I’d like to ask you this kind of in closing. For anybody out there that is on the fence about coming to a workshop or becoming a one-on-one coaching client, we do offer a free 13 point assessment they can schedule at Thrivetimeshow.com. But if you had to describe the coaching experience and what it’s done for you and maybe a line or two or final 60 seconds here, how would you describe what the business coaching has done for you and your business, sir?

Cody Ellis:

I mean, I’m profitable. I wake up every day with just a peace of mind that it’s going to be a great day as long as I follow the steps and just go by, just look at your agenda that you guys send me and I kind of just follow that every day and then I take down my notes. I’m old school. I don’t sit in front of a computer much, but I like to write everything down and I keep my folders with me and make my phone calls and that’s it.

Clay Clark:

And what would you say to anybody out there that’s thinking about scheduling a 13 point assessment? What would you say to anybody out there that’s a business owner that’s thinking about scheduling a free consultation?

Cody Ellis:

Why wouldn’t you? If you want to grow your company, it’s a no-brainer, as you would say.

Clay Clark:

No brainer. Cody Ellis, thank you for carving out time for us and anybody out there watching today, please be encouraged. I don’t mean this as a backhanded compliment, but Cody is a very normal person. He’s a hardworking guy. He’s a trustworthy guy. He’s a diligent guy. Is he perfect to know? Am I perfect? No. What I’m saying is if you’re out there today, you have the tenacity and the capacity needed to become successful. This could be your year, but you got to take the first step. Go to Thrivetimeshow.com, schedule that free 13 point assessment again at Thrivetimeshow.com. Cody, thank you so much sir. Hope you have a great rest of your day.

Sean:

Thank you.

Cody Ellis:

Hey, thank you guys. Appreciate it.

Clay Clark:

Take care.

Sean:

See you.

Clay Clark:

Bye.

Cody Ellis:

Bye.

Robert Kiyosaki:

I learned at the Academy at Kings Point in New York, Acta, non verba. Watch what a person does, not what they say.

Clay Clark:

All right, thrive Nation. On today’s show, we’re going to be breaking down what Robert Kiyosaki has recently been talking about. Robert Kiyosaki, the best-selling author, the New York Times best-selling author in real estate investment guru has recently been talking more and more about Acta, non verba. You say, “What’s Acta, non verba?” Well, one, it’s Latin, so don’t get too concerned there, but it’s Acta… Again, this is Acta, non verba. What it means is action. You need to watch what people do and not what they say. That’s the idea. Watch what somebody does and not what they say.

Ryan Wimpey:

Hi, I am Ryan Wimpey. And

Rachel Wimpey:

I’m Rachel Wimpey. And the name of our business is Tip Top Canine.

Ryan Wimpey:

Our business is a dog training business. We help people with behavioral issues and teach their dog how to listen. When I was learning to become a dog trainer, we didn’t learn anything about internet marketing or advertising or anything at all. Just dog training. And that’s what’s so great about working with Clay and his team because they do it all for us so that

Rachel Wimpey:

We can focus on our passion and that’s training dogs. Clay and his team here, they’re so enthusiastic. Their energy is off the charts. Never a dull moment here at Thrive.

Ryan Wimpey:

We’ve been working with Clay and his team for the last five months, two of which has been our biggest months ever. One, our biggest gross by 35%. Clay’s helped us make anything from brochures to stickers, new business cards, new logos, scripts for phones, script for emails, script for text message ,scripting for everything.

Rachel Wimpey:

How I would describe the weekly meetings with Clay and his team are awesome. They’re so effective. It’s worth every minute. Things get done. We’ll ask for things like different flyers and they’re done before our hour is up. So it’s just awesome, extremely effective.

Ryan Wimpey:

If you don’t use Clay and his team, you’re probably going to be pulling your hair out or you’re going to spend half of your time trying to figure out the online marketing game and producing your own flyers and marketing materials or print materials, all this stuff like that. You’re really losing a lot as far as lost productivity and lost time. Not having a professional do it. It has a real sense of urgency and it actually knows what they’re doing when you already have something that’s your core focus that you already know how to do.

Rachel Wimpey:

You would also be missing out with all the time and financial freedom that you would have working with Clay and his team.

Ryan Wimpey:

We would recommend Clay and his team to other business owners because they need to be working on their business, not just trying to figure out the online game, which is complex and changing daily.

No one has a marketing team too. Most people don’t. They can’t afford one and their local web guy or a local person that they know probably can’t do everything that a whole team and a whole floor of people can do in hours and not just weeks or months. There’s a definite sense of urgency with Clay and his team. I used to have to ride other web people, I mean really ride them to get stuff done. And stuff is done so fast here and people, there’s a real sense of urgency to get it done. It’s great.

Robert Kiyosaki:

I learned at the Academy at King’s Point in New York, Acta, non verba. Watch what a person does, not what they say.

Clay Clark:

Deeds not words. So Acta, non verba. Deeds, not words or acts, not words. James, a lot of people, they come to our business workshops because they’re listening to our podcast, our business podcast, and they say, “Man, I want to achieve massive success.” And they see some of the testimonials and they go, “If that guy could do it, I could do it.” That’s kind of where it starts.

James:

I see it happen all the time, Clay.

Clay Clark:

Because your desk is about two inches from mine.

James:

Right.

Clay Clark:

So people will say, “Oh, if that guy can do it, then I can do it.”

James:

That’s correct.

Clay Clark:

So the two big principles I want to teach on today’s show, just two principles. One is this idea of Acta, non verba. Means acts, not words. The second concept I want to teach is that money is a magnifier.

Paul Hood:

I was looking to learn how to take my business, like they’ve said today from being very successful to being systematic. I’ve got a very successful practice in three different cities, make good money. Just wanted to take it to the next level with systems and processes to where I can drive my cars more.

Clay Clark:

Paul Hood.

Paul Hood:

I’ve been a CPA for 33 years.

Clay Clark:

And what kind of growth have you and your great team had here over the past, let’s say five, six years?

Paul Hood:

When I met you five years ago, we were doing $3 million. This year we’ll do $24 million.

Clay Clark:

Which is more than… And he’s an accountant, so we’re going to talk about that. So Paul introduced me to Bob, because he said, “There’s a guy that came into my office looking to raise some capital.” I think that was the thing. And he needed to get some sales going. That’s how. And so if we tell Paul from the accounting perspective, I’m going to pass the mic to you. You do accounting. Why do you have to have a website makes sense, and all that branding stuff? How has that impacted your brand, having websites and all those branding things in place?

Paul Hood:

Well, when I met you, like most CPAs, I thought my clients only come from referrals, but we get five [inaudible 01:52:57] leads in a two-month period every month just off of Google. And so this is my face. We have 17 offices across four states we have [inaudible 01:53:08] in every state, but this is our face. Like what you were saying. It’s visual and it [inaudible 01:53:16] us to say why we’re different, that about us in there as spectacular and it’s an industry that has changed. We’re modifying it. We’re going to… We offer our services a subscript model to where it’s all inclusive and it’s just been awesome.

Clay Clark:

We’ll determine the level of success.

Paul Hood:

So success in business is not what you know how to do. It’s actually doing it. And so the thing that I would tell you is stop it, get like this guy and let him go after it. Insane, because then you can be doing what you do well and take that time and invest in something else. On top of that, on top of that, as contacts, and this is… I don’t get anything for selling his… Just telling you what he’s done for us so that we could focus. And then he’ll come in and I’ll say, “I think I’ve got it all.” And he listens for five minutes and he makes one and I want to slap myself in the face. “Well, why didn’t I think about that? That’s idiotic.” But they’re sick freaks. They just get it done.

Clay Clark:

I don’t know. I think it’s merit-based pay in our office. So if the people here, they get paid. So if we were taking on your account, and someone else to do this, but if you hired a different marketing company, I’m just giving you best practices. You want to make sure that they win when you win. So like in our office, if we grow Dave [inaudible 01:54:40], podcast, that benefits our company. To the extended benefits them, but we actually benefit if they benefit. Does that make sense to you?

Robert Kiyosaki:

I learned at the Academy at Kings Point in New York, Acta, non verba. Watch what a person does, not what they say.

Clay Clark:

So on today’s show, I’m going to just hammer testimonials. So you can see people that heard about the conference through a podcast or through a friend or whatever, and they had a business that was stagnant. It was stuck. It wasn’t growing, it wasn’t thriving, it was just surviving. It was stagnant, it was stuck. It wasn’t growing. It was just stagnant. It was stuck. It wasn’t thriving, it was surviving. And they heard about the podcast, they heard about the conference, they heard about the success stories and they came to the conference. That’s step one. They came to the conference.

And by the way, if you go to Thrivetimeshow.com Thrivetimeshow.com, you can name your price for all the workshops I do. We want to make it affordable for everybody. So they came out to the in-person two day workshop. They went to Thrive Time Show. They requested a ticket. We called them, got them their ticket. Then James, we interviewed them after the conference and we said, “How was it?

Ryan Wimpey:

Hey, I am Ryan Wimpey. I’m originally from Tulsa, born and raised here. We’ve definitely learned a lot about life design and making sure the business serves you. The goal setting, while it’s not like it’s somewhat basic stuff, making sure we have different goals for every part of your life, is super important.

Also, the linear workflow. The linear workflow for us in getting everything out on paper and documented is really important. We have workflows that are all over the place. So having linear workflow and seeing that mapped out on multiple different boards is pretty awesome. That’s really helpful for me.

The atmosphere here is awesome. I definitely just stared at the walls, figuring out how to make my facility look like this place. This place rocks. It’s invigorating. The walls are super… It’s just very cool. The atmosphere is cool. The people are nice. It’s a pretty cool place to be. Very good learning atmosphere. I literally want to model it and steal everything that’s here at this facility and basically create it just on our business side.

Robert Kiyosaki:

I learned at the Academy at King’s Point in New York, Acta, non verba. Watch what a person does, not what they say.

Clay Clark:

And they said, “Oh my gosh, I learned so much about business. I learned about the workflows and the marketing and the search engine optimization and the branding and the hiring and the checklists and all the bookkeeping, the search engine optimization, the online advertising, the social media. I learned it all. Yes, I learned it.” However, it’s acts, not words. Acta, non verba.

So James, if somebody comes to a conference and they learn all this stuff but they don’t apply it, what happens?

James:

Nothing happens.

Clay Clark:

But there is a certain group of people, not our listeners who run around acquiring information and they don’t apply it.

James:

Those are the worst types.

Clay Clark:

So this is what happens is Napoleon Hill, the bestselling author, he says that knowledge without application is meaningless. Napoleon Hill, the bestselling author, Think and Grow Rich.

Aaron Antis:

Hi, I’m Aaron Antis with Shaw Homes. I first heard about Clay through a mortgage lender here in town who had told me what a great job he had been doing for them and I actually noticed he was driving a Lamborghini all of a sudden. So I was willing to listen.

In my career, I’ve sold a little over $800 million in real estate. So honestly, I thought I kind of knew everything about marketing and homes. And then I met Clay and my perception of what I knew and what I could do definitely changed. After doing $800 million in sales over a 15 year career. I really thought I knew what I was doing. I’ve been managing a large team of salespeople for the last 10 years here with Shaw Homes and I mean we’ve been a company that’s been in business for 35 years. We’ve become one of the largest builders in the Tulsa area, and that was without Clay.

So when I came to know Clay, I really thought, “Man, there’s not much more I need to know, but I’m willing to listen.” The interesting thing is our internet leads from our website has actually, in a four month period of time, has gone from somewhere around 10 to 15 leads in a month to 180 internet leads in a month. Just from the few things that he’s shown us how to implement that I honestly probably never would’ve come up with on my own. So I got a lot of good things to say about the system that Clay put in place with us and it’s just been an incredible experience. I am very glad that we met and had the opportunity to work with Clay.

So the interaction with the team and with Clay on a weekly basis is honestly very enlightening. One of the things that I love about Clay’s perspective on things is that he doesn’t come from my industry. He’s not somebody who’s in the home building industry. I’ve listened to all the experts in my field. Our company has paid for me to go to seminars, international builders shows, all kinds of places where I’ve had the opportunity to learn from the experts in my industry. But the thing that I’ve found working with Clay is that he comes from such a broad spectrum of working with so many different types of businesses that he has a perspective that’s difficult for me to gain because I get so entrenched in what I do, I’m not paying attention to what other leading industry experts are doing, and Clay really brings that perspective for me. It is very valuable time every week when I get that hour with him.

From my perspective, the reason that any business owner who’s thinking about hooking up with Thrive needs to definitely consider it is because the results that we’ve gotten in a very short period of time are honestly monumental. It has really exceeded my wildest expectation of what he might be able to do. I came in skeptical because I’m very pragmatic and as I’ve gone through the process over just a few months, I’ve realized it’s probably one of the best moves we’ve ever made.

I think a lot of people probably feel like they don’t need a business or marketing consultant because they maybe are a little bit prideful and like to think they know everything. I know that’s how I felt coming in. I mean, we’re a big company that’s definitely one of the largest in town, and so we kind of felt like we knew what we were doing and I think for a lot of people, they let their ego get in the way of listening to somebody that might have a better or different perspective than theirs. I would just really encourage you, if you’re thinking about working with Clay, I mean the thing is it’s month to month. Go give it a try and see what happens. I think in the 35 year history of Shaw Homes, this is probably the best thing that’s happened to us, and I know if you give him a shot, I think you’ll feel the same way.

I know for me, the thing I would’ve missed out on if I didn’t work with Clay is I would’ve missed out on literally an 1800% increase in our internet leads going from 10 a month to 180 a month. That would’ve been a huge financial decision to just decide not to give it a shot.

I would absolutely recommend Clay Clark to anybody who’s thinking about working with somebody in marketing. I would skip over anybody else you were thinking about and I would go straight to Clay and his team. I guarantee you’re not going to regret it because we sure haven’t.

Robert Kiyosaki:

I learned at the Academy at King’s point in New York, Acta, non verba. Watch what a person does, not what they say.

Clay Clark:

Knowledge without application is meaningless. So James, if somebody comes to a conference and they learn all this and they don’t apply it, that doesn’t matter because the idea is Acta, non verba. Acts, not words. So if people come to this conference, you’re going to see testimonies of people who came to the conference and they say, “Wow, I had no idea that this was possible”. And then you’re going to see people… I’m going to show you a testimony as a people that applied what we taught them. People that have grown their accounting practice. Now, by the way, an accounting practice. This is not someone who has invented the concept of accounting. There’s other accounting. This is just it. There are other accountants.

Paul Hood:

My business, it consists… I’m a CPA and a financial advisor and we’re very successful. I wanted to go from successful to systematic. I wanted to learn systems and processes so that the business can run without me.

Robert Kiyosaki:

I learned at the Academy at King’s point in New York, Acta, non verba. Watch what a person does, not what they say.

Clay Clark:

But this person, they came to the conference, they learned about how to scale their company. I taught them how to create a subscription model for their accounting as opposed to doing the traditional accounting model, and they’ve grown the company from $3 million to over $20 million.

James:

Wow.

Clay Clark:

Then you’re going to see a testimonial of success story of a home builder who grew the home building business from $15 million to over $150 million. A home builder, and by the way, this is just it. There are other home builders. But this home builder grew from $15 million to $150 million in sales.

James:

That’s life-changing, Clay.

Clay Clark:

You’re going to hear about a dog trainer who came to this event. Now, let me tell you about the dog trainer. He came to this event and he had a wonderful business that was just… It was stagnant. It was stuck. It wasn’t able to grow. A great guy, knew how to train dogs, but he didn’t have a no-brainer offer. He didn’t have a website that was optimized. He didn’t have branding that made sense. He didn’t have a one sheet.

Rachel Wimpey:

I’m Rachel with Tip Top Canine and we just want to give a huge thank you to Clay and Vanessa Clark.

Ryan Wimpey:

Hey guys, I’m Ryan with Tip Top Canine. Just want to say a big thank you to Thrive 15, thank you to Make Your Life Epic. We love you guys, we appreciate you, and really just appreciate how far you’ve taken us.

This is our old house. This is where we used to live few years ago. This is our old neighborhood. See, it’s nice, right?

So this is my old van and our old-school marketing, and this is our old team and by team, I mean it’s me and another guy.

Rachel Wimpey:

This is our new house with our new neighborhood.

This is our new van with our new marketing, and this is our new team. We went from four to fourteen and I took this beautiful photo.

We worked with several different business coaches in the past and they were all about helping Ryan sell better and just teaching sales, which is awesome. But Ryan is a really great salesman. So we didn’t need that. We needed somebody to help us get everything that was in his head out into systems, into manuals and scripts, and actually build a team. So now that we have systems in place, we’ve gone from one to 10 locations in only a year.

Ryan Wimpey:

In October, 2016, we’ve grossed $13 grand for the whole month. Right now it’s 2018, the month of October. It’s only the 22nd. We’ve already grossed a little over $50 grand for the whole month and we still have time to go. We’re just thankful for you, thankful for Thrive and your mentorship, and we’re really thankful that you guys have helped us to grow a business that we run now instead of the business running us. Just thank you, thank you, thank you times a thousand.

Rachel Wimpey:

So we really just want to thank you Clay, and thank you Vanessa for everything you’ve done, everything you’ve helped us with. We love you guys.

Robert Kiyosaki:

I learned at the Academy at Kings Point in New York, Acta, non verba. Watch what a person does, not what they say.

Clay Clark:

He didn’t have branding that made sense. He didn’t have a one sheet. Didn’t have a pricing structure that worked. Didn’t have a linear workflow. Didn’t have an office culture, environment. Didn’t have decoration in the office that would make people want to work there. Didn’t understand the process of hiring, inspiring, training, and retaining great people. Didn’t have a pro forma. Didn’t know how to franchise, didn’t know how to license. But what we do, James, is we take people in. They come to the conference, they learn this stuff and they go, “Could you teach me how to do it?” And I say, “Absolutely.”

Now folks, here’s the secret sauce that allows me to be the boss. My job is to make big obstacles seem small. Here’s the secret sauce that allows me to be the boss. My job is to make big obstacles seem small.

Paul Hood:

A favorite aspect is probably just how entertaining it is and the fact that I pick up one or two or three things every time I come to take my business to the next level.

Well, if people are missing out.

PART 4 OF 5 ENDS [02:08:04]

Speaker 4:

-next level. Well, if people are missing out on basically a plan, a guaranteed plan, pretty much if you’re willing to work it to be successful. Most people… I think everybody should attend one of these workshops at least once because you don’t know what you don’t know. And we’re not taught to be successful in school.

Robert Kiyosaki:

I learned at the academy, I think Kings Point in New York, Akta, non verba, watch what a person does, not what they say.

Clay Clark:

A lot of people, they have a fear or a phobia of scaling their business or building the processes. They feel like they don’t know what to do or they need a coach or a mentor to guide them down the path. And so on today’s show, you’re going to see people that came to a conference, step one. Step two, we taught them how to apply these principles at the conference. Step three, they hired us to help them scale their company. Step four, you’re going to hear their success stories. Now, James, money is a magnifier.

Speaker 5:

We have a little bit of news for you guys. It’s now what? May 31st at 6:21. You’ve been closed for 20 minutes.

Speaker 6:

Right.

Speaker 5:

No, it’s now June, so let’s run the numbers for May. Let’s see what he got.

Speaker 6:

Run some totals. 102,837.

Speaker 5:

What’s last year to date? 102,837 this year?

Speaker 6:

And last year was 60,667.

Speaker 5:

Whoa!

Speaker 6:

Whoo! Coming out of the weeds now.

Speaker 5:

Boom, baby!

Speaker 6:

Boom! Out of the weeds, onto the pavement.

Robert Kiyosaki:

I learned at the academy, I think King’s Point in New York, Akta, non verba. Watch what a person does, not what they say.

Clay Clark:

What does that mean? Because we’re going to share with you some stories today of an accountant who grew a business from $3 million to 20 plus million dollars, of a home builder who grew a business from 15 million to 150 million, of a dog trainer that was able to scale his business from a stagnant business to 15 plus locations to grow the business that was perpetually stuck at 400,000-ish. Grow that into a million dollar plus annual revenue.

This year’s sales for this week.

Kat Graham:

So this is the same week last year. Do you see the difference? Look.

Clay Clark:

What is that? I can’t really tell. One is-

Kat Graham:

Can you see? Look.

Clay Clark:

Michael, can we just… I just want to get a… Jason, can you pull this end maybe just so you can see it. Let’s pull it that way.

Kat Graham:

Yeah, we can-

Clay Clark:

Let’s get the length. I can’t tell without the length.

Kat Graham:

You have to see-

Clay Clark:

It’s hard to tell.

Kat Graham:

Look at that. Okay.

Clay Clark:

So that was last year’s sales.

Kat Graham:

This is last year’s sales. And the total is a mere $4,711.73. Same week this year, 2015, the total is… Read it, Michael.

Michael:

11,313.50.

Clay Clark:

Oh, boom!

Kat Graham:

Whoo, yes!

Clay Clark:

There it is!

Kat Graham:

What?

Clay Clark:

Awesome!

Charles Colaw:

Hello, my name is Charles Colaw with Colaw Fitness. Today I want to tell you a little bit about Clay Clark and how I know Clay Clark. Clay Clark has been my business coach since 2017. He’s helped us grow from two locations to now six locations. We’re planning to do seven locations in seven years, and then franchise And Clay has done a great job of helping us navigate anything that has to do with running the business, building the systems, the checklists, the workflows, the audits, how to navigate lease agreements, how to buy property, how to work with brokers and builders.

This guy’s just amazing. This kind of guy has worked in every single industry. He’s written books with Lee Crockwell, head of Disney with the 40,000 cast members. He’s friends with Mike Lindell. He does Reawaken America Tours where he does these tours all across the country where 10,000 or more people show up to some of these tours. On the day-to-Day, he does anywhere from about 160 companies.

He’s at the top. He has a team of business coaches, videographers and graphic designers and web developers, and they run 160 companies every single week. So, think of this guy with a team of business coaches running 160 companies. So in the weekly, he’s running 160 companies every six to eight weeks, he’s doing Reawaken America tours every six to eight weeks. He’s also doing business conferences where 200 people show up and he teaches people a 13 step proven system that he’s done and worked with billionaires, helping them grow their companies.

I’ve seen guys from startups go from startup to being multimillionaires, teaching people how to get time freedom and financial freedom through the system. Critical thinking, document creation, making it, putting it into organizing everything in their head, to building it into a franchisable scalable business. One of his business has 500 franchises. That’s just one of the companies or brands that he works with.

So, amazing guy. Elon Musk, smart guy. He comes off sometimes as socially awkward, but he’s so brilliant and he’s taught me so much. When I say that, Clay is… He doesn’t care what people think when you’re talking to him. He cares about where you’re going in your life and where he can get you to go. And that’s what I like him most about. He’s a good coach. A coach isn’t just making you feel good all the time. A coach is actually helping you get to the best you and Clay has been amazing business coach.

Through the course of that, we became friends. When I was really most impressed with him is when I was shadowing him one time. We went into a business deal and listened to it. I got to shadow and listen to it. And when we walked out, I knew that he could make millions on the deal and they were super excited about working with him. And he told me, he’s like, “I’m not going to touch it. I’m going to turn it down”, because he knew it was going to harm the common good of people in the long run, and the guy’s integrity just really wowed me. It brought tears to my eyes to see that this guy, his highest desire was to do what’s right.

And anyways, just an amazing man. So anyways, impacted me a lot. He’s helped navigate, anytime I’ve gotten nervous or worried about how to run the company or navigating competition and an economy that’s… I remember we got closed down for three months. He helped us navigate on how to stay open, how to get back open, how to just survive through all the Covid shutdowns, lockdowns, because our clubs were all closed for three months and you have $350,000 of bills you’ve got to pay, and we have no accounts receivable. He helped us navigate that. And of course we were conservative enough that we could afford to take that on for a period of time.

But anyways, a great man, I’m very impressed with him. So Clay, thank you for everything you’re doing. And I encourage you, if you haven’t ever worked with Clay, work with Clay, he’s going to help magnify you. And there’s nobody I have ever met that has the ability to work as hard as he does. He probably sleeps four, maybe six hours a day, and literally the rest of the time he’s working and he can outwork everybody in the room every single day and he loves it. So anyways, this is Charles Colaw with Colaw Fitness. Thank you, Clay. And anybody out there that’s wanting to work with Clay, it’s a great, great opportunity to ever work with him. So you guys have a blessed one. This is Charles Colaw. We’ll see you guys.

Robert Kiyosaki:

I learned at the academy, I think King’s Point in New York, Akta non verba. Watch what a person does, not what they say.

Clay Clark:

When I say money’s a magnifier, James, what does that mean?

James:

It means if you’re already a great person, the money will allow you to do greater things. And if you’re not a great person, you’re going to do things that are just… You’re going to do more of the bad stuff.

Clay Clark:

Right, because money’s a magnifier. That’s what it’s.

James:

Right.

Clay Clark:

So if you’re a greedy… I don’t want to say a greedy bastard, because that would then infer that just because you don’t have a father in your life, that means that you’re greedy. I’m not going to say that. That doesn’t make any sense. But if you’re somebody who’s greedy… The Bible states for the love of money is the root of all evil. Says for the love of money is the root of all evil. Not money itself. Money is just a tool and people that are obsessed with money itself become a tool of the money.

Josh Spurrell:

Hi, my name is Josh Spurrell from Spurrell and Associates, chartered professional accountants based out of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. I met Clay at a conference, at his conference in Tulsa in June of 2018. Started working with the coaching program shortly after there. The experience has been great. You really have a partner in the grind. Most people, I like to say most people are wrong about most things about business most of the time. And it’s very difficult for entrepreneurs to connect with other entrepreneurs who actually know what they’re talking about when it comes to business. But Clay and his team really does understand.

The tangible improvements that we’ve seen is we’re up over 50% since starting with the coaching program and they’re helping to help business owners create time freedom and financial freedom. They know what you’re going to think. You’re going to say, “What the heck are you going to do with your time freedom and financial freedom when you’re in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada? That’s the most northerly city in North America with a million people.” We’re probably just sitting in our igloos hoping for some television. But I’ll give you an idea of what we’re doing in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

So over here we have Sandra and we have Emma. Emma, say, “Hello.”

Emma:

Hi, everybody. This is my daddy’s channel.

James:

Emma really likes any video. So let’s see what actually the time freedom, financial freedom can do for you in Edmonton. So believe it or not, we have a beach here guys, and I’ll take you on the little tour of Edmonton’s Beach. Now it’s not what you Americans are going to think of this beach. This is a northern beach.

We’ve got a really cool slide here. I don’t know if you can see this purple slide. This purple slide that you’re looking at here has a full loop-da-loop. It knocks you completely upside down when you go to it. Let’s see if I get the right angle here. No, that does not appear physically possible, but it really is going to knock you upside down. I went on it last time. And here is the Edmonton Beach. This is a northern beach. You guys out in Tulsa, you Americans think you have all the beaches here, but here is the northern beach complete with waves.

We got 30 degree weather inside here. Oh, sorry, 30, that’s 90 for you guys over there. I got to do the translation of math in my head. And we even got a zip line that we can ride down here. And this is what we’re doing with our time freedom and financial freedom in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, thanks to the Thrive Time team. Thanks very much guys.

Robert Kiyosaki:

I learned that the academy, I think King’s Point in New York, Akta non verba. Watch what a person does, not what they say.

Clay Clark:

But money’s just a tool. Money’s like a hammer, money’s like a tire, money’s like a sock, money’s like a car. You could use a car for bad things. You could use a hammer for bad things. A lot of people could… You could kill somebody with a hammer. You could kill somebody with a sock, I guess if you wanted to. You could kill somebody with a tire if you wanted to. But there’s a lot of creative thoughts going through people’s minds right now. But the thing is, is that money is just a magnifier. In the I Timothy 6:10 reads, “For the love of money is the root of all evil, which while some coveted after they have erred from the faith and have pierced themselves through with many sorrows.”

And so what happens is, is that money is a magnifier. And so if you’re somebody who’s greedy and nefarious and will throw somebody under the bus to make an extra dollar, money’s going to allow you to be more of a greedy personality type that will throw somebody under the bus for a dollar. That’s what money will allow you to do.

Jennifer Johnson:

The number of new customers that we’ve had is up 411% over last year. We are Jared and Jennifer Johnson. We own Platinum Pest & Lawn and are located in Awasa, Oklahoma. And we have been working with Thrive for business coaching for almost a year now.

Jared Johnson:

Yeah. So what we want to do is we want to share some wins with you guys that we’ve had by working with Thrive. First of all, we’re on the top page of Google now. I just want to let you know what type of accomplishment this is. Our competition, Orkin, Terminex, they’re both $1.3 billion companies. They both have two to 3000 pages of content attached to their website. So to basically go from virtually non-existent on Google to up on the top page is really saying something.

But that’s come by being diligent to the systems that Thrive has, by being consistent and diligent on doing podcasts and staying on top of those podcasts to really help with getting up with our listing and our ranking there with Google.

Jennifer Johnson:

And also, we’ve been trying to get Google reviews, asking our customers for reviews, and now we’re the highest rated and most reviewed pest and lawn company in the Tulsa area. And that’s really helped with our conversion rate. And the number of new customers that we’ve had is up 411% over last year.

Jared Johnson:

Wait. Say that again. How much are we up?

Jennifer Johnson:

411%.

Jared Johnson:

Okay, so 411% we’re up with our new customers. Amazing.

Jennifer Johnson:

Right. So not only do we have more customers calling in, we’re able to close those deals at a much higher rate than we were before. Right now, our closing rate is about 85%, and that’s largely due to, first of all, our Google reviews that we’ve gotten. People really see that our customers are happy, but also we have a script that we follow. And so when customers call in, they get all the information that they need. That script has been refined time and time again. It wasn’t a one and done deal. It was a system that we followed with Thrive in the refining process, and that has obviously… The 411% shows that that system works.

Jared Johnson:

Yeah. So, here’s a big win for you. So last week alone, our booking percentage was 91%. We actually booked more deals, more new customers last year than we did the first five months… Or, I’m sorry. We booked more deals last week than we did the first five months of last year from before we worked with Thrive. So again, we booked more deals last week than the first five months of last year, and it’s incredible. But the reason why we have that success is by implementing the systems that Thrive has taught us and helped us out with.

Jennifer Johnson:

Some of those systems that we’ve implemented are group interviews. That way, we’ve really been able to come up with a really great team. We’ve created and implemented checklists, that way everything gets done and it gets done right. It creates accountability. We’re able to make sure that everything gets done properly, both out in the field and also in our office. And also doing the podcast like Jared had mentioned, that has really, really contributed to our success. But that, like I said, the diligence and consistency and doing those and that system has really, really been a big blessing in our lives. And also, it’s really shown that we’ve gotten the success from following those systems.

Jared Johnson:

Yeah. So before working with Thrive, we were basically stuck, really no new growth with our business. And we were in a rut and we didn’t know-

Jennifer Johnson:

Oh, sorry. The last three years, our customer base had pretty much stayed the same. We weren’t shrinking, but we weren’t really growing either.

Jared Johnson:

Yeah. And so we didn’t really know where to go, what to do, how to get out of this rut that we were in. But Thrive helped us with that. They implemented those systems, they taught us those systems. They taught us the knowledge that we needed in order to succeed. Now it’s been a grind, absolutely, it’s been a grind this last year. But we’re getting those fruits from that hard work and the diligent effort that we’re able to put into it. So again, we were in rut. Thrive helped us get out of that rut. And if you’re thinking about working with Thrive, quit thinking about it and just do it.

Do the action and you’ll get the results. It will take hard work and discipline, but that’s what it’s going to take in order to really succeed. So we just want to give a big shout-out to Thrive, a big thank you out there to Thrive. We wouldn’t be where we’re at now without their help.

Robert Kiyosaki:

I learned at the academy, I think King’s Point in New York, Akta non verba. Watch what a person does, not what they say.

Clay Clark:

Now if you’re a grateful person, if you’re a kind person… And James, that’s why we only work with grateful, kind of people. That’s why when we share these testimonies of wonderful, great kind of people, it’s a blasty blast. James, that’s what’s fun about capturing these success stories is that real people at the peak of their success are explaining to you how they did it. And luckily, James, we’re able to actually gather footage of some of these people at the beginning when they first came to a conference and then at the peak when they achieve massive success.

So James, I am fired up for people to watch this testimonial, but let’s make sure I’m being a good teacher here. The two concepts I want to teach you, one for anybody out there, it’s called Akta non verba, which in Latin means acts, not words. That’s the idea, is acts, not words. Okay? That’s what it means. And then I want to teach a second concept, which again, money is a magnifier.

Robert Kiyosaki:

I learned at the academy, I think Kings Point in New York, Akta non verba. Watch what a person does, not what they say.

Clay Clark:

James, in your own words, what does it mean? You say, “Akta non verba.” You go, “I don’t understand what you’re saying.” You say, “Well, it’s Latin. It means…” In your mind, what does that mean?

James:

It means you can’t just talk about it. You have to be about it.

Clay Clark:

That’s how it works. And somebody says, “Well, Clay, I can’t afford coaching with you guys.” Well, the good news, we only take out 160 clients, so we might not be available. But we do have scholarship pricing. Now, this is how I make money. This is the secret sauce that allows me to be the boss. One, I make the big obstacles seem small. And two, a lot of my clients, I get a small percentage of the growth. So James, why would I be so motivated to help somebody who is struggling and they’re stagnant? Why would I want to invest the time for my own…

If you take the altruism out of it, the fact that I grew up poor and I want to help people be successful, why would I would help somebody to scale a company if I get 2%?

We are joined by none other than my brother from another mother, Mr. Josh, the founder of Living Water Irrigation. Mr. Josh, welcome onto the show, my friend. How are you?

Josh Wilson:

I’m awesome, Clay. How are you, sir?

Clay Clark:

Well, I’m excited for the listeners to get to know more about you. Could you share the name of your company, a little bit more about what you guys do at Living Water Irrigation, where the name comes from?

Josh Wilson:

Absolutely, positively. So Living Water Irrigation, the most important part of that to me is John 7:38. So it’s mentioned in the gospel a number of times. We’re the Living Water, but our specific scripture that we drew our name from is John 7:38. It says, “Whoever believes in me, rivers of living water will flow through him.” We have a very distinct vision as a company on who we are and what we want to do. And I believe that I was put here to go make some money to give it away.

Clay Clark:

And I’m not going to ask you for the specific details of your career and how you started the business as far as linear timeline, but how long has this particular business been around?

Josh Wilson:

We’ve been around just two years, sir.

Clay Clark:

Two years. And you guys… We first met, how did we first meet?

Josh Wilson:

I came in and y’all started coaching me over the Thrive time, over Thrive15.

Clay Clark:

Do you remember when that was approximately and how you first heard about us?

Josh Wilson:

So it would’ve been October or November of ’17.

Clay Clark:

October or November of ’17.

Josh Wilson:

Yes, sir.

Clay Clark:

And in terms of your growth as a company, how much have you grown this year?

Josh Wilson:

So this year we’re up 450% year over year.

Clay Clark:

So now that you’re implementing this program, you’re getting more calls, right? Are you getting more calls?

Josh Wilson:

Absolutely.

Clay Clark:

Sales are going up.

Josh Wilson:

Absolutely.

Clay Clark:

You’re gathering reviews from your real customers, adding content to the website, adding a gallery of work.

Josh Wilson:

I’m going to actually take a minute and make you really uncomfortable, Clay.

Clay Clark:

Nice.

Josh Wilson:

When we started with y’all, it was awesome. We had a little company, just me and one dude in one little van. And ’17 was great. I ate more than Ramen noodles, but not much more. ’18 was really good. We started to implement the systems. Got started here, got the Boom Book, went to a couple conferences and said, “Okay, I’m going to buy in. I’m going to sell out.” We went to the coaching, got coached by Marshall and Victoria and started to implement as opposed to just listen, to actually be doers. It’s in James. It says, “Don’t just be hearers of the word, but be doers as well.” And so we implemented scripts, we implemented systems, we implemented checklists, we implemented a pro forma for quoting and all these things that you talk about.

And so just as a real person, and I’m real, I promise you. There’s a bunch of Josh Wilson’s out there. I’m a famous baseball player and football player.

Clay Clark:

Oh, wow!

Josh Wilson:

And a gospel singer.

Clay Clark:

Oh, whoa!

Josh Wilson:

But this Josh Wilson just digs ditches for a living. But I just want to say thank you. I’m standing here for all the systems. I encourage everybody out there, go pick up Start Here. Go pick up the Boom Book, the stuff you hear on the show, it actually sincerely works.

Robert Kiyosaki:

I learned at the academy, I think King’s Point in New York, Akta, non verba. Watch what a person does, not what they say.

James:

Why would I want to help somebody to scale a company if I get 2%? Because when they grow, then you win too.

Clay Clark:

Right. It’s a win-win. It’s called Shalom. Look it up, folks. It’s Shalom. It’s a biblical concept, the idea of a win-win. It’s not a zero-sum negotiation. If you’re out there and you’re a decent person, you have a soul, you want to create a Shalom relationship, a win-win relationship with your partner. So I make more as my clients make more. That’s how that works. It’s a win-win kind of thing. So, that’s the idea. And again, James people can go to thrivetimeshow.com, they can request a ticket. We let them name their price, and we do these conferences every two months. Every two months we do a business conference. And you’ve met these people, James.

James:

I do. And you know what? I’ve met them when they came in and their business is struggling, and then I’ve seen how they’ve transformed after a few months. It’s like getting a haircut. When you go in and you look real dirty and you come out and you look like the top of the world.

Clay Clark:

The money is a magnifier and Akta non verba, this idea that acts, not words. It’s all about action and gaining traction. It’s not about just learning new concepts, because knowledge without application is meaningless, to quote the great Napoleon Hill. James, you’re a beautiful man. You smell terrific. I can’t wait for people to see you at our in-person workshops. Again, folks, get those tickets at thrivetimeshow.com, thrivetimeshow.com. They’re two days. They’re interactive. We open up the doors at 7:00 AM. We go until about 3:00 PM each day. We do a 30-minute teaching sprint, a 15-minute Q&A session, and then we break, and then we do 30 minutes of training, 15-minute Q&A, and then we break, and then 30 minutes of training and then 50…

So you’re going to learn branding, marketing, search engine, all these things. And then James, we have helicopter rides. We do the helicopter rides from time to time. I think we’re roasting a pig at this next one. I’m not sure when you’re going to hear this podcast book, but we’re roasting a pig. We’re giving away cash prizes, we’re giving away… It is a blasty blast, folks. It’s like the opposite of business college. It truly is business school without the BS.

James, again, you’re almost like a benefit we should add to the package. When people go to thrivetimeshow.com, it’s like, “And you get to meet James.” So get those tickets again, folks at thrivetimeshow.com. James, I really do appreciate you joining me today and to folks, again, get those tickets at thrivetimeshow.com.

Robert Kiyosaki:

I’ll just leave people with these words. Watch what a person does, not what they say.

Rachel Wimpey:

I’m Rachel with Tip Top K9, and we just want to give a huge thank you to Clay and Vanessa Clark.

Ryan:

Hey guys, I’m Ryan with Tip Top K9. Just want to say a big thank you to Thrive15, thank you to Make Your Life Epic. We love you guys, we appreciate you and really just appreciate how far you’ve taken us.

Ryan:

This is our old house. This is where we used to live years ago. This is our old neighborhood. See, it’s nice, right?

So this is my old van and our old school marketing, and this is our old team. And by team, I mean it’s me and another guy.

Rachel Wimpey:

This is our new house with our new neighborhood.

This is our new van with our new marketing, and this is our new team. We went from four to 14 and I took this beautiful photo. We worked with several different business coaches in the past, and they were all about helping Ryan sell better and just teaching sales, which is awesome. But Ryan is a really great salesman, so we didn’t need that. We needed somebody to help us get everything that was in his head out into systems, into manuals and scripts, and actually build a team. So now that we have systems in place, we’ve gone from one to 10 locations in only a year.

Ryan:

In October, 2016, we gross 13 grand for the whole month. Right now it’s 2018, the month of October, it’s only the 22nd. We’ve already grossed a little over 50 grand for the whole month, and we still have time to go. We’re just thankful for you, thankful for Thrive and your mentorship. And we’re really thankful that you guys have helped us to grow a business that we run now instead of the business running us. Just thank you, thank you, thank you times a thousands.

Clay Clark:

The Thrive Time Show two day interactive business workshops are the world’s highest rated and most reviewed business workshops because we teach you what you need to know to grow.

James:

You can learn the proven 13 point business system that Dr. Zelner and I have used over and over to start and grow successful companies. When we get into the specifics, the specific steps on what you need to do to optimize your website. We’re going to teach you how to fix your conversion rate. We’re going to teach you how to do a social media marketing campaign that works. How do you raise capital? How do you get a small business loan? We teach you everything you need to know here during a two day, 15 hour workshop. It’s all here for you. You work every day in your business, but for two days you can escape and work on your business and build these proven systems, so now you can have a successful company that will produce both the time freedom and the financial freedom that you deserve.

You’re going to leave energized, motivated, but you’re also going to leave empowered. The reason why I’ve built these workshops is because as an entrepreneur, I always wish that I had this. And because there wasn’t anything like this, I would go to these motivational seminars, no money down real estate, Ponzi scheme, get motivated seminars, and they would never teach me anything. It was like you went there and you paid for the big chocolate Easter Bunny, but inside of it was a hollow nothingness. And I wanted the knowledge. And they’re like, “Oh, but we’ll teach you the knowledge after our next workshop.”

And the great thing is we have nothing to upsell. At every workshop we teach you what you need to know. There’s no one in the back of the room trying to sell you some next big get rich quick walk on hot coals product. It’s literally, we teach you the brass tacks, the specific stuff that you need to know to learn how to start and grow a business.

I encourage you to not believe what I’m saying, and I want you to Google the Z66 auto auction. I want you to Google Elephant in the Room. Look at Robert Zellner and Associates. Look them up and say, “Are they successful because they’re geniuses or are they successful because they have a proven system?” When you do that research, you will discover that the same system that we use in our own business can be used in your business. Come to Tulsa, book a ticket, and I guarantee you it’s going to be the best business workshop ever, and we’ll even give you your money back if you don’t love it. We’ve built this facility for you and we’re excited to see it.

Clay Clark:

And now you may be thinking, “What does it actually cost to attend an in-person two day interactive Thrive Time Show business workshop?” Well, good news, the tickets are $250 or whatever price that you can afford. What? Yes, they’re $250 or whatever price you can afford. I grew up without money and I know what it’s like to live without money. So if you’re out there today and you want to attend our in-person two day interactive Business workshop, all you got to do is go to thrivetimeshow.com to request those tickets. And if you can’t afford $250, we have scholarship pricing available to make it affordable for you.

Robert Kiyosaki:

Good morning, good morning, good morning. Robert Kiyosaki, the Rich Dad Radio Show. Today on broadcasting from Phoenix, Arizona, not Scottsdale, Arizona. They’re closed, but they’re completely different worlds. And I have a special guest today. Definition of intelligence is if you agree with me, you’re intelligent, and so this gentleman is very intelligent. I’ve done this show before also, but very seldom do you find somebody who lines up on all counts as Mr. Clay Clark. He’s a friend of a good friend, Eric Trump. But we’re also talking about money, bricks, and how screwed up the world can get in a half hour. So Clay Clark is a very intelligent man, and there’s so many ways we could take this thing, but I thought since you and Eric are close, Trump, what were you saying about what Trump can’t… What Donald, who’s my age, and I can say or cannot say. What-

Clay Clark:

First off, I have to honor you, sir. I want to show you what I did to one of your books here.

Robert Kiyosaki:

All right.

Clay Clark:

There’s a guy in the name of Jeremy Thorn, who was my boss at the time. I was 19 years old working at Faith Highway. I had a job at Applebee’s, Target and DirecTV, and he said, “Have you read this book, Rich Dad, Poor Dad?” And I said, “No.” And my father, may he rest in peace, he didn’t know these financial principles. So I started reading all of your books and really devouring your books. And I went from being an employee to self-employed, to the business owner, to the investor, and I owe a lot of that to you. And I just wanted to take a moment to tell you thank you so much for allowing me to achieve success, and then I’ll tell you all about Eric Trump. But I just want to tell you, thank you, sir, for changing my life.

Robert Kiyosaki:

Well, not only that, Clay, thank you, but you’ve become an influencer. More than anything else, you’ve evolved into an influencer where your word has more and more power. So that’s why I congratulate you on becoming, because as you know, there’s a lot of fake influencers out there too. Or bad influencers.

Clay Clark:

Yeah.

Robert Kiyosaki:

So anyway, I’m glad you and I agree so much, and thanks for reading my books.

Clay Clark:

Yeah.

Robert Kiyosaki:

That’s the greatest thrill for me today. Not a thrill, but recognition is when people, young men especially come up and say, “I read your book, it changed my life. I’m doing this, I’m doing this, I’m doing this.”

I learned at the academy, I think King’s Point in New York, Akta, non verba. Watch what a person does, not what they say.

 

Discover How Clay Clark Helped Tim Redmond to Scale His Business Consulting Business Below:

 

 

When Tim Redmond approached Clay Clark about scaling his business, Tim Redmond said, “I would have anywhere from 5 to 20 clients w/ networking, but it would go up and down. Clay, that’s why I came to you.”

Because Clay Clark had a proven track record of scaling businesses, Tim Redmond knew that he could trust Clay Clark to help him scale his business Redmond Growth which would “have anywhere from 5 to 20 clients with networking, but it would go up and down. Clay, that’s why I came to you.”

As time went on Tim Redmond discovered that Clay Clark’s systems and methods for scaling a business were highly-effective, innovative and unique. In fact Clay Clark’s one-of-kind “Hype Man” video was so unique that Tim Redmond actually created a “Hype Man” video that is nearly the same as Clay Clark’s hype man video (see the examples below):

In order to help Tim Redmond to enhance his online reputation Clay Clark helped Tim Redmond to get featured on many local newscasts and broadcasts including, but not limited to:

 

Tim Redmond | Featured on Channel 8 | Motivational Speaker –

WATCH – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CSTdCKMP5k4

 

In order to help Tim Redmond to enhance in conversion rate, Clay Clark worked with Tim Redmond to create a “How It Works” video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xya-q3nCBMw 

In order to help Tim Redmond to create and enhance his online profile and online reputation, Clay Clark worked with Tim Redmond to create the following content and more:

  1. https://www.thrivetimeshow.com/business-podcasts/business-podcast-why-do-96-of-businesses-fail-within-10-years-according-to-inc-magazine-what-you-must-do-if-you-want-to-succeed-in-business-celebrating-the-tim-redmond-success-story/
  2. https://www.thrivetimeshow.com/business-podcasts/tim-redmond-i-would-have-anywhere-from-5-clients-to-20-clients-with-networking-but-it-would-go-up-and-down-clay-thats-why-i-came-to-you-ive-doubled-every-year-since-wo-2/
  3. https://www.thrivetimeshow.com/business-podcasts/business-coach-episode-2-trade-outs-business-good-idea/
  4. https://www.thrivetimeshow.com/business-podcasts/business-coach-episode-03-throw-investor-party/
  5. https://www.thrivetimeshow.com/business-podcasts/business-coach-best-way-market-business-online-ep-31/
  6. https://www.thrivetimeshow.com/business-podcasts/business-coach-three-priniciples-blocking-time-family-friends-ep-30/
  7. https://www.thrivetimeshow.com/mindset-podcasts/
  8. https://www.thrivetimeshow.com/finance-accounting/
  9. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYbXaXPaoqA
  10. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUcCP4AaNqA
  11. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0dzAMBvhu_8
  12. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Osn91lT6wpU
  13. https://www.thrivetimeshow.com/knowledge-bombs/

Throughout the years, Clay Clark mentored and taught Tim Redmond the proven systems and processes for nearly every aspect of business growth including, but not limited to the following:

  1. Clay Clark created the www.RedmondGrowth.com website
  2. Clay Clark refined / created the Tim Redmond logo 
  3. Clay Clark refined / created the Tim Redmond core story
  4. Clay Clark refined / created the Tim Redmond value proposition
  5. Clay Clark refined / created the Tim Redmond outbound sales scripts
  6. Clay Clark refined / created the Tim Redmond headshots
  7. Clay Clark refined / created the Tim Redmond PR Kit
  8. Clay Clark refined / created the Tim Redmond call recording sales systems
  9. Clay Clark refined / created trained the call representatives that made outbound calls for Tim Redmond to acquire new clients
  10. Clay Clark provided free office space for Tim Redmond so that he would have an office environment that would be attractive for the recruiting of Redmond Growth’s first employees.
  11. Clay Clark conducted the weekly group interviews so that Tim Redmond could find and hire new employees.
  12. Clay Clark conducted the Monday Morning meetings to train Tim Redmond’s first employees.
  13. Clay Clark provided daily coaching meetings and training for Tim Redmond’s team.
  14. Clay Clark trained Tim Redmond’s first coach / consultant (Tim Redmond’s son) Robert Redmond.
  15. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond search engine optimization.
  16. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to build landing pages that convert.
  17. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to write search engine optimization content.
  18. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to train a sales team.
  19. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to conduct the group interview.
  20. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to launch online advertisements.
  21. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to track online advertisements.
  22. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to turn speaking events into viable leads.
  23. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to acquire new clients.
  24. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to retain clients.
  25. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to lead a business workshop and conference by allowing Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond to speak for free at Clay Clark’s 2-day interactive business workshops at Clay Clark’s office that Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond were officing in for free.
  26. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to optimize their Google map.
  27. Clay Clark painted a door red and designed the interior of their office space so that it would be conducive for hiring new employees.
  28. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to improve the branding for their clients in a linear fashion.
  29. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to install a 3-legged marketing stool for Redmond Growth.
  30. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to install a 3-legged marketing stool for their clients.
  31. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond what a 3-legged marketing stool was.
  32. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to create a one sheet for their clients.
  33. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to create a one sheet for Redmond Growth.
  34. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to write pre-written sales emails.
  35. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to create a sales culture and outbound call center.
  36. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to create tracking sheets for clients that are usable and trackable.
  37. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to create checklists and repeatable processes for their clients.
  38. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to train business coaches by actually training the Redmond Growth business coaches.
  39. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond the importance of having a weekly accountability meeting with clients to prevent drifting.
  40. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to gather video reviews from happy clients.
  41. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to enhance your online reputation.
  42. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to produce podcasts.
  43. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to document client success stories and case studies.
  44. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to create effective no-brainer offers for their clients.
  45. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to generate speaking opportunities via online marketing.
  46. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to create a history timeline. 
  47. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to create an “About Us” video.
  48. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to utilize public relations to increase your conversion rate.
  49. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to use WordPress websites.
  50. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to create WordPress websites.
  51. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to start and grow a business coaching and business growth business and he did this because Clay Clark and Tim Redmond had entered into a signed contractual agreement where Tim Redmond agreed to pay Clay Clark a flat monthly fee for each new client that Redmond Growth acquired. Read the agreement HERE
  52. Clay Clark taught Robert Redmond and Tim Redmond how to grow a business consulting business from 5 to 20 clients to a business growth consulting business with 100+ clients. “I would have anywhere from 5 to 20 clients w/ networking, but it would go up and down. Clay, that’s why I came to you. I’ve doubled every year since working with you. That’s 100% growth every year. I’ve doubled 5 times.” – Tim Redmond

 

 

To Learn More About Tim Redmond And Redmond Growth Check Out the Following Websites And Website Pages:

  1. https://www.thrivetimeshow.com/tim-redmond-learn-more-about-redmond-growth-founder-tim-redmond/ 
  2. https://www.thrivetimeshow.com/business-podcasts/the-tim-redmond-story-ive-doubled-the-size-of-my-company-every-year-that-ive-worked-with-clay-clark/ 
  3. https://www.thrivetimeshow.com/business-podcasts/tim-redmond-i-would-have-anywhere-from-5-clients-to-20-clients-with-networking-but-it-would-go-up-and-down-clay-thats-why-i-came-to-you-ive-doubled-every-year-since-wo/ 
  4. https://www.thrivetimeshow.com/business-podcasts/tim-redmond-i-would-have-anywhere-from-5-clients-to-20-clients-with-networking-but-it-would-go-up-and-down-clay-thats-why-i-came-to-you-ive-doubled-every-year-since-wo/ 
  5. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RGg6NxN-RRA 
  6. https://thrivetimeshow.libsyn.com/tim-redmond-i-would-have-anywhere-from-5-clients-to-20-clients-with-networking-but-it-would-go-up-and-down-clay-thats-why-i-came-to-you-ive-doubled-every-year-since-working-w-you-thats-100-growth-every-year-ive-doubled-5-times 
  7. https://www.thrivetimeshow.com/business-podcasts/business-coach-episode-2-trade-outs-business-good-idea/ 
  8. https://player.fm/series/thrivetime-show-business-school-without-the-bs-2804823/tim-redmond-i-would-have-anywhere-from-5-clients-to-20-clients-with-networking-but-it-would-go-up-and-down-clay-thats-why-i-came-to-you-ive-doubled-every-year-since-working-w-you-thats-100-growth-every-year-ive-doubled-5-times 
  9. https://www.imdb.com/title/tt30824912/ 
  10. https://redmondgrowth.com/consulting-tulsa-promote-powerful-tulsa-business-growth/ 
  11. https://www.thrivetimeshow.com/business-coach-podcast-v1/ 
  12. https://redmondgrowth.com/consulting-tulsa-tremendously-develop-your-business-planning-skills/ 
  13. https://www.thrivetimeshow.com/business-podcasts/business-coach-episode-03-throw-investor-party/ 
  14. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rGm_rWrjLN8 
  15. https://player.fm/series/thrivetime-show-business-school-without-the-bs-2456013/business-podcast-why-do-96-of-businesses-fail-within-10-years-according-to-inc-magazine-what-you-must-do-if-you-want-to-succeed-in-business-celebrating-the-tim-redmond-success-story 
  16. https://www.thrivetimeshow.com/business-podcasts/business-coach-episode-18-going-business-family/ 
  17. https://www.thrivetimeshow.com/seo-pages/50-management-maxims/ 
  18. https://www.listennotes.com/top-podcasts/tim-redmond/ 
  19. https://archive.org/details/rlgtm5pktbivxjuoha1kxmjiqqupucjvgpkki3ha
  20. www.RedmondGrowth.com

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